Graduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

For current course schedule information and registration, visit SIS.

*Please note the modalities listed for each course. A description of each modality is listed below:

Teaching Class In-Person with Students Attending Remotely or In-Person.
Faculty using this modality would teach in a tech-enhanced classroom on the Homewood campus. Students may attend in person or remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Teaching Class Remotely with Students Attending Remotely or In-Person.
Faculty using this modality would teach a course by streaming into the classroom from a remote location, which could include a dedicated studio, a modified classroom, or an office. A teaching assistant or technology assistant might be in the classroom to manage the technology and to facilitate student engagement. Students may attend in person or remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Hybrid Course (50% In-Person and 50% Online).
Faculty using this modality would teach a course by alternating the meeting pattern between in-person and online. This could be done by teaching class in-person for week 1, online for week 2, in-person for week 3, etc. Such an option reduces in-person contact hours and increases opportunities for different instructors to use the same instructional space. Students must also have the option to attend in-person sessions remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Online-Synchronous Components.
Faculty using this modality will teach students remotely. Faculty will incorporate asynchronous components to the course, but the class would still have a day/time for
synchronous zoom meetings. Any synchronous components will need an alternative for students to participate asynchronously due to time zone differences, etc.
Online-100% Asynchronous.
Faculty using this modality will pre-record instructional content for asynchronous delivery. Courses will be designed intentionally so that course content, student engagement, and assessment would all occur without the need to hold zoom sessions during a regular day and time.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

American Movement
AS.060.613 (01)

This seminar examines representations of people in motion in U.S. writing from 1900 to the present. Migration, international and intranational, will be central to our study, but we’ll also consider other forms of travel, transits of authorial and readerly attention, experiences of vagrancy and acceleration, and predicaments of stasis in primary texts as well as theoretical work around mobility. Authors and directors studied may include Simone de Beauvoir, Henry James, Gayl Jones, Jack Kerouac, Chang-Rae Lee, Claude McKay, Bernadette Mayer, Muriel Rukeyser, and Gertrude Stein.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Postcolonial/Global/World
AS.060.614 (01)

The field now known as “global Anglophone literature” has emerged from a complicated and rapidly advancing disciplinary lineage. A host of past and present recordings – including postcolonial, Commonwealth, Third World, global, transnational, world, and the Global South – provide a record of the wider profession’s anxieties in relation to non-Western literary traditions. This course prepares graduate students to be able to articulate some of the subtle differences in approach that this nexus of closely related terms may obscure, from the heyday of postcolonial theory in the 1980s and 90s to contemporary subfields like Indian Ocean studies. In addition to key critical texts by theorists including Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Franco Moretti, Peter Hallward, and Emily Apter, students will be introduced to some outstanding recent methodologies and critiques from the adjacent body of work on comparative literature.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

What was Literary Character?
AS.060.645 (01)

What role did literary character play along the passage from ancient theories of dramatic action to contemporary theories of subjectivity and personhood? What role, specifically, did Shakespearean personhood play in the theorization of literature’s capacity to stage and represent a portable, exemplary “self”? How do group categories of race, gender and class qualify and inflect the ostensive individuation of character outcomes? As test cases, in this course we will consider an array of early modern literary persons from before and after Shakespeare as depicted in poetry, drama and prose : Heywood’s Lucrece, Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Cleopatra, Middleton’s Timon, Moliere’s Alceste, Milton’s Christ and Behn’s Oroonoko. This course will range widely across theorists of literary character and the reader/character relationship, considering Aristotle, Theophrastus, Sir Thomas Overbury, Sigmund Freud, Aaron Kunin, Blakey Vermeule, Toril Moi, Rita Felski, Amanda Anderson, and Thomas Metzinger, among others.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Essay Form & Academic Prose
AS.060.649 (01)

While we will spend some time with the history and theory of the essay, much of our time will be spent considering the contemporary essay and its form. Across the past decade, academics have increasingly published essays designed for non-specialists. We’ll study many of them, both as objects of critical attention and of practical value. Writing assignments will include the option to write essays.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:30PM
  • Instructor: Miller, Andrew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Journal Club
AS.060.696 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.060.800 (01)

This course is a semester-long independent research course for graduate students. Students will have one-on-one assignments and check-in's with designated faculty throughout the semester.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Thompson, Mark C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.060.800 (02)

This course is a semester-long independent research course for graduate students. Students will have one-on-one assignments and check-in's with designated faculty throughout the semester.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.060.800 (03)

This course is a semester-long independent research course for graduate students. Students will have one-on-one assignments and check-in's with designated faculty throughout the semester.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Individual Work
AS.060.893 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Thompson, Mark C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Reading
AS.060.894 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Thompson, Mark C
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.060.613 (01)American MovementT 1:30PM - 4:30PMMao, Douglas 
AS.060.614 (01)Postcolonial/Global/WorldW 1:30PM - 4:30PMJackson, Jeanne-Marie 
AS.060.645 (01)What was Literary Character?Th 1:30PM - 4:30PMDaniel, Andrew 
AS.060.649 (01)The Essay Form & Academic ProseM 1:30PM - 4:30PMMiller, Andrew 
AS.060.696 (01)Journal ClubDaniel, Andrew 
AS.060.800 (01)Independent StudyThompson, Mark C 
AS.060.800 (02)Independent StudyAchinstein, Sharon 
AS.060.800 (03)Independent StudyDaniel, Andrew 
AS.060.893 (01)Individual WorkThompson, Mark C 
AS.060.894 (01)Independent ReadingThompson, Mark C