Graduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

For current course schedule information and registration, visit SIS.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Proseminar
AS.060.602 (01)

This course is intended to train students in skills required by the discipline, help prepare them for a range of futures, and integrate them into the university community.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:00PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Gilman 130D  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Human Rights Before Human Rights
AS.060.615 (01)

This course asks in what ways did literature mitigate population category distinctions within a pre-history of human rights from the period 1500-1700. We will take the situations of sponsored violence, and in particular, war captivity, in order to explore how premodern concepts of duties, rights, atrocity, inhumanity (and prohibitions against abuse) arise and become a locus of mimetic complexity within the literature of the period. Prospecting a historical transformation between ancient, early modern, and modern conceptions of rights, duties, and the human, readings may include: Euripides, Suppliant Women; Seneca, Trojan Women; Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida; Cicero, Grotius, Gentili, Vitoria, Las Casas, Spenser, Bradstreet, Milton, Dryden, and Behn, as well as literature depicting violence resulting from Britain's East India Company's global intrusions. Splicing apart the "human" from "rights" we consider theoretical material from the liberal tradition and its critique; the problem of 'failed universals'; the historical connection between natural law and human rights; the distinctions drawn around legal and gendered categories of person; and critical race theory, with readings from Asad, Foucault, Moten, Wynter, Cavarero, Brown, Butler, Rawls, Dworkin, Drucilla Cornell, depending on the class's interests.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:00PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room: Gilman 130D  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/8
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

The Romance
AS.060.654 (01)

This graduate seminar takes a long view of the romance—the genre of literary imagination, par excellence—as originating and recurring in the Anglo world as a crucial technology of settler indigenization on stolen land and also of Indigenous resistance to settler fantasies of realization, from twelfth-century Norman England and Ireland to nineteenth-century North America and Australasia. Texts may include: Geoffrey of Monmouth, History of the Kings of Britain; Wace, Roman de Brut; Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Hope Leslie; Joseph Smith, The Book of Mormon; Mark Twain, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; Simon Pokagon, Queen of the Woods; Eleanor Catton, The Luminaries.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:00PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hickman, Jared W
  • Room: Gilman 130D  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Independent Study
AS.060.800 (02)

This course is a semester-long independent research course for graduate students. Students will have one-on-one assignments and check-in's with designated faculty throughout the semester.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Reading
AS.060.894 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor:
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.060.800 (01)

This course is a semester-long independent research course for graduate students. Students will have one-on-one assignments and check-in's with designated faculty throughout the semester.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Cannon, Christopher
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Individual Work
AS.060.893 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor:
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 27/40
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.060.800 (03)

This course is a semester-long independent research course for graduate students. Students will have one-on-one assignments and check-in's with designated faculty throughout the semester.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Nealon, Chris
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Poetry and Philosophy
AS.213.623 (01)

This course will trace the tensions, antagonisms, and collaborations between poetry and philosophy as distinctive but fundamental expressions of human thought and experience. We will engage poetry as a form of artistic expression that compliments, completes, or challenges other forms of knowledge, and consider the range of philosophy's responses to poetry and poetics. Readings will include works by philosophical poets and poetic philosophers including Hölderlin, Schlegel, Rilke, Bachmann, Celan, Stevens, Heidegger, Gadamer, Adorno, Benjamin, Merleau-Ponty, Valéry, Wittgenstein, and Agamben.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:00PM - 3:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Gilman 443  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

1922 and Its Neighbors
AS.060.658 (01)

A course focusing on works published in the _annus mirabilis_ of modernism, 1922, and the years nearby. In addition to reading these texts in detail, we’ll consider what it means to periodize at a granular level and how our primary texts and theoretical readings take up the problem of the neighbor as well as questions of of hospitality, community, social obligation, and domesticity.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:00PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room: Gilman 130D  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.060.602 (01)ProseminarM 1:00PM - 4:00PMRosenthal, Jesse KarlGilman 130D
AS.060.615 (01)Human Rights Before Human RightsT 1:00PM - 4:00PMAchinstein, SharonGilman 130DENGL-PR1800
AS.060.654 (01)The RomanceTh 1:00PM - 4:00PMHickman, Jared WGilman 130DENGL-PR1800
AS.060.800 (02)Independent StudyMao, Douglas 
AS.060.894 (01)Independent Reading 
AS.060.800 (01)Independent StudyCannon, Christopher 
AS.060.893 (01)Individual Work 
AS.060.800 (03)Independent StudyNealon, Chris 
AS.213.623 (01)Poetry and PhilosophyW 1:00PM - 3:00PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaGilman 443
AS.060.658 (01)1922 and Its NeighborsW 1:00PM - 4:00PMMao, DouglasGilman 130D