Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Clint Eastwood, Race and the American Western
AS.060.220 (01)

Drawing from the body of work engaging and recording the Hollywood gunfighter and outlaw folk-hero Clint Eastwood, the course will investigate American cinematic representations of slavery and its absence, the Civil War, and racial formation along the United States’ southwestern frontier in films produced from the 1950s through the contemporary period. A focus on the cultural icon Clint Eastwood enables a close examination of American cinematic fantasies of the frontier, frontier violence and the desire to escape or erase the tensions of race and slavery that have deeply permeated the American cultural consciousness, particularly the creation of American masculine ideals. The course will also take decided note of the national shift from liberal “Great Society Programs” of the 1960s to the conservative “neoliberal” social and cultural ideals in the 1980s and 1990s. Our purpose is to consider the organization and reformation of hegemonic power by way of the complex morality play the western film evokes, typically considering the interstitial geographies between civilization and savagery, belonging and alienation, and metropolitan and colonial outpost. We will privilege in our discussions the contested frontiers of racial dominion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Gilman 55 Hodson 303
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Clint Eastwood, Race and the American Western
AS.060.220 (02)

Drawing from the body of work engaging and recording the Hollywood gunfighter and outlaw folk-hero Clint Eastwood, the course will investigate American cinematic representations of slavery and its absence, the Civil War, and racial formation along the United States’ southwestern frontier in films produced from the 1950s through the contemporary period. A focus on the cultural icon Clint Eastwood enables a close examination of American cinematic fantasies of the frontier, frontier violence and the desire to escape or erase the tensions of race and slavery that have deeply permeated the American cultural consciousness, particularly the creation of American masculine ideals. The course will also take decided note of the national shift from liberal “Great Society Programs” of the 1960s to the conservative “neoliberal” social and cultural ideals in the 1980s and 1990s. Our purpose is to consider the organization and reformation of hegemonic power by way of the complex morality play the western film evokes, typically considering the interstitial geographies between civilization and savagery, belonging and alienation, and metropolitan and colonial outpost. We will privilege in our discussions the contested frontiers of racial dominion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Gilman 55  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Malcolm and Martin: An Intro to the Lives and Thought of Two Icons of the Black Freedom Struggle
AS.060.365 (01)

Using their speeches, written lectures and published writings and drawing from their biographies, this course will explore the important life work of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. We intend to upend traditional conversations about political radicalism and ethnic politics by analyzing these spokesmen associated most indelibly with black nationalism and racial integration, respectively.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Gilman 77  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/14
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Jewish American Literature
AS.060.382 (01)

This course explores significant features of the Jewish American literary tradition, but defines Jewish writing somewhat loosely: texts include a novel about pre-Depression immigrant experience in New York City, Yiddish “Sweatshop Poetry” in translation, WWII-era writings about Antifa resistance, Holocaust fiction, postmodern mystical poetry, and a “Gay Fantasia on National Themes.” Along the way, we’ll discuss how Jewish writing is also always about class, race, gender, and sexuality. Writers may include Abraham Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, Paul Goodman, Delmore Schwartz, Abraham Joshua Heschel, Tillie Olsen, Grace Paley, Cynthia Ozick, and Philip Roth; dramatists may include Clifford Odets, Lillian Hellman, and Tony Kushner; poets may include Muriel Rukeyser, Allen Ginsberg, George Oppen, and Adrienne Rich.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Streim, Alexander Michael (Alex)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Old World/New World Women
AS.060.388 (01)

The course considers the transatlantic writing of three women in the early modern period, Anne Bradstreet, Aphra Behn, and Phillis Wheatley. We will consider issues of identity, spatiality, religion, commerce, enforced labor, sexuality, race, and gender, along with literary tradition, formal analysis and poetics. We will read a good deal of these early women writers. Foremost in our mind will be the question of how perceptions of space and time are mediated through the global experiences of early modernity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room: Shaffer 304  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

American Cultural Criticism
AS.100.240 (01)

This course explores 20th century U.S. history through the works of writers and artists. We will ask how essays, novels, performance, and art can function as cultural and social criticism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Hawkey, Chloe I
  • Room: Gilman 219  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room: Smokler Center 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Bodies and Pleasures
AS.213.321 (01)

This course traces a literary history of sexuality from the Middle Ages to contemporary women’s writing. We will analyze how sexual pleasure changed over time. In particular, we will discuss what role literature plays in the reproduction and transformation of bodily pleasures. The course explores how the pleasures of bodies are imagined in and through literature, but also whether words are bodies that give pleasure and perhaps even have their own pleasures.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Pahl, Katrin
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

21st Century Female Playwrights
AS.225.318 (01)

This is a writing intensive class exploring the current wealth of women playwrights, including Pulitzer Prize winners: Wendy Wasserstein, Paula Vogel, Lynn Nottage, and Jackie Sibblies Drury (2019 Prize for FAIRVIEW). We will discuss Script Analysis and read (and see) plays by numerous writers including Claire Barron, Kia Corthron, Theresa Rebeck, Sarah Ruhl, Danai Gurira, Caleen Sinnette Jennings, and Hansol Jung. This class will include a mid-term and a Final Paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Denithorne, Margaret (Margaret)
  • Room: Merrick 105  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of African American Studies, with attention to the literature, film, culture, history, and politics of black life in the United States. Our reading list will likely include texts by David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E.W. Harper, Sutton Griggs, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Toni Morrison, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room: Maryland 217  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Women writers and the sonnet from the European Renaissance to the Harlem Renaissance
AS.363.226 (01)

Shakespeare's description of his lover's eyes as 'nothing like the sun' is both an homage and a sendup of the 300-year-old Petrarchan tradition in which the male poetic persona remains forever enraptured by an unattainable female beloved, who never speaks. Beginning with a review of Shakespeare’s sonnet sequence and selections from Petrarch’s sonnets to an elusive Laura, we will read a series of fifteenth-and sixteenth-century women writers who inserted their own voices into this evolving tradition by allowing “Laura” to talk back. These include Vittoria Colonna (and her interactive sonnets with Michelangelo), Veronica Gambara, and Gaspara Stampa; dueling personas in sonnets by French poets Pernette du Guillet and Maurice Scéve, and sonnets by more familiar Shakespearean contemporaries Lady Mary Wroth and Sir Philip Sidney (both of whom reflect back on Petrarch but from quite different viewpoints). In the final section of the course we will apply our newly acquired historical perspective to selections from a more recently available corpus of female-authored sonnets from the Harlem Renaissance. All continental works will be read in translation; no previous familiarity with the topic is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Writing about a Film - The Tragedy of Macbeth
AS.060.114 (01)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: O'Connor, Marie T (Marisa)
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Vaccines, Science, and Values
AS.060.114 (04)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Wilbanks, Rebecca
  • Room: Croft Hall G02  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

FYS: Great Books at Hopkins - a closer reading
AS.001.134 (01)

Modeled after Johns Hopkin’s longstanding Great Books course, this Freshman seminar offers a more focused selection of texts to allow in-depth reading and discussion, with greater attention to historical context. Texts will include: The Odyssey, Paradise Lost, Frankenstein, and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, written by himself, with excerpts from additional slave narratives. In-class lectures and discussions will be supplemented by occasional guest lectures and exhibits from the archives of Eisenhower Libraries. Prior attendance in Great Books at Hopkins is not required; upper class students who have previously taken Great Books may be admitted with permission of instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (01)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Brodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy (Anne-Elizabeth)
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (02)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Brodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy (Anne-Elizabeth)
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literary Study
AS.060.107 (01)

This course serves as an introduction to the basic methods of and critical approaches to the study of literature. Some sections may have further individual topic descriptions; please check in SIS when searching for courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room: Shaffer 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literary Study
AS.060.107 (02)

This course serves as an introduction to the basic methods of and critical approaches to the study of literature. Some sections may have further individual topic descriptions; please check in SIS when searching for courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Repairing the ‘Highway to Nowhere
AS.060.114 (02)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Speller, Morris Elsmere Longley (Mo)
  • Room: MSE Library D1  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Repairing the ‘Highway to Nowhere
AS.060.114 (03)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Speller, Morris Elsmere Longley (Mo)
  • Room: MSE Library D1  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Shakespeare’s Richard III and Disability
AS.060.114 (05)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Best, Royce Lee
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The Cost of Free Speech?
AS.060.114 (07)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Oppel, George
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Shakespeare’s Richard III and Disability
AS.060.114 (06)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Best, Royce Lee
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The Cost of Free Speech?
AS.060.114 (08)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Oppel, George
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Reintroduction to Writing
AS.060.114 (10)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Pavesich, Matthew
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Who Writes History?
AS.060.114 (09)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Waller, Jill S
  • Room: Maryland 104  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Who/What/When/Where/Why?
AS.060.114 (14)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Ross, Sarah Catherine
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Swamp Things
AS.060.114 (19)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Dubay, Noelle Victoria
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Revenge and Morality
AS.060.114 (18)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lewis, Alexander (Alex)
  • Room: Smokler Center 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Who/What/When/Where/Why?
AS.060.114 (15)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Ross, Sarah Catherine
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The Politics of Pop
AS.060.114 (22)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Huttner, Tobias Reed
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of Work
AS.060.114 (26)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Begg, Aaron Jared
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Exploring the Philosophy of Love
AS.060.114 (23)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Koullas, Sandy Gillian
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Stories from the American South
AS.060.114 (17)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Murphy, Jamison F
  • Room: Krieger 304  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: What Do We Owe to Animals
AS.060.114 (11)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Powell, Kevin Matthew (Kevin)
  • Room: Bloomberg 276  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Swamp Things
AS.060.114 (20)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Dubay, Noelle Victoria
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The Politics of Pop
AS.060.114 (21)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Huttner, Tobias Reed
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Exploring the Philosophy of Love
AS.060.114 (24)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Koullas, Sandy Gillian
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Contemporary American Short Stories
AS.060.114 (25)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Berger, Donald W
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Policing the Police
AS.060.114 (12)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Carter, Bryan
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Witchcraft and Power
AS.060.114 (16)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Cutler, Sylvia (Sylvia)
  • Room: Smokler Center Library  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Happily Ever After: Fantasies of Nineteenth-Century Romance
AS.060.366 (01)

Why are we so invested in the fantasy of nineteenth-century romance? From a craze for Jane Austen to Shonda Rhimes’ Bridgerton, we keep coming back to balls, dashing heroes, and the marriage plot. Who, and what, do these fantasies empower? Who gets left out of the romance? This course examines both the realities of nineteenth-century marriage, love, and sexuality, and their modern re-imaginings. We cover gendered readership during the nineteenth-century print boom, the idea of canonical literature, and the role of race, class, and sexuality in both society and romantic narratives, as well as the difference between “high” and “low” culture, filmic adaptation, and fan-culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Makonnen, Atesede Retta (Sede)
  • Room: Gilman 130D  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Marxism and Literature
AS.060.343 (01)

This course will provide a survey of some of the concepts in Marx’s work, especially those to be found in volume 1 of Capital, that might help us get a clearer sense of 21st-century politics and culture. We will move outward from reading Marx to reading recent and classic texts in the Marxist critical tradition. We will discuss explicitly economic ideas about commodities, surplus value, and concrete and abstract labor, as well as historical and political ideas like “primitive accumulation” and the “uneven and combined development” of nations. We will think about what reading Marx and the Marxist tradition can help us see about colonialism, gender, race, technology, and the environment, as well as how it can clarify the character of economic crises. Toward the end of the term we will turn to literary texts, not necessarily “Marxist” themselves, to help us understand important questions that Marxism cannot tackle by itself, like: who are people, anyway? What do they hope for, when they write? Is there a Marxist idea of beauty, and is it different than everybody else’s? Along with Marx, and anti-colonial, anti-racist and feminist writers in the Marxist tradition, we’ll read work by the novelist NK Jemisin, and the poet Stephanie Young.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Nealon, Christopher (Chris)
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Poetry and Politics Today
AS.060.355 (01)

The history of poetry is full of political poems of every kind — odes, epics, dramatic persona poems. And the history of literary criticism is full of denunciations of poetry that gets “too political,” and loses sight of its job to give pleasure. In this course, we will look at a range of contemporary poetry that tackles political issues — things like the causes of climate change; immigration crises; white supremacy; patriarchal gender systems; the legacies of colonialism — and study the ways it accomplishes its goals while still giving us the kinds of surprise in language that poetry has always promised. Reading will include (but not be limited to) work by Tongo Eisen-Martin, Cathy Park Hong, Sandra Simonds, Stephanie Young, and Wendy Trevino.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Nealon, Christopher (Chris)
  • Room: Shaffer 100  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Henry James
AS.060.363 (01)

This seminar will focus on the novels and short fiction of one of the most brilliant crafters of prose and plot ever to write in English. Extensive attention will be devoted to the intricacies of James’s language; to his transatlantic situation; to his relationship to other authors; and to his place in the histories of literature, criticism, and theory. In a few instances, we will read his work in relation to writing by his brother, the pioneering philosopher and psychologist William James.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room: Shaffer 304  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Decolonizing Early Modern Mathematics: Reading Nature’s Language
AS.060.376 (01)

Mathematics has been called the “queen of the sciences,” and today, much like a political sovereign, mathematical concepts govern aspects of nearly every facet of our lives. Because mathematics has come to form the baseline of today's innovative technologies, it is not a stretch to say that math often mediates our relations to the material world. Asking how math, science, technology, and culture fit together, therefore, is a political question. We might also ask, then: is mathematics active or complicit in racist, classist, sexist, or ableist oppression? As mathematics began changing the way that Europeans related to the world of matter and energy in the early modern period, it also began to reorder the world according to abstract, symbolic systems whose applications and manipulations of material entities—human and nonhuman—continue to reverberate across the centuries. Examining the encounters of early modern European scientists with Indigenous Amerindian Nations and their empirical methods of world-making in the Atlantic world, this class will examine how famous European mathematicians and logistical thinkers materially aided the colonial expansion of the British empire by developing more exact techniques for navigation, military maneuvers, agriculture, literary poetics, and political rhetoric. An equal part of this class will also be devoted to thinking through Indigenous systems of knowledge known as Traditional Ecological Knowledge, or TEK. This class, therefore, is specifically designed to train students in interdisciplinary thinking. Social sciences and humanities majors will find models to conceptualize the cultural and political significance of mathematics. STEM students will be encouraged to think about the material consequences of the abstract thought systems they are trained to manipulate in their courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Doherty, Nathanael Joseph
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Edmund Spenser's Fairie Queene
AS.060.377 (01)

After a diagnostic introduction to his early poetry, this reading intensive seminar will concentrate upon Edmund Spenser’s masterpiece, The Faerie Queene (1590/1596), which we will read in its entirety.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 388  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Expository Writing: Science Fiction and Climate Catastrophe
AS.060.114 (28)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Shipko, David Thomas, Jr.
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Why We Laugh
AS.060.114 (30)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Tinkle, Robert E
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Zombies
AS.060.216 (02)

This lecture survey will attempt to answer why the zombie has become such a fixture in contemporary literature and cinema. We will track this figure across its many incarnations--from its late-eighteenth-century appearance in ethnographic fictions growing out of the modern cultures of racialized slavery in the Americas right up to twenty-first-century Hollywood blockbusters in which the origins of the figure in the cultures of racialized slavery are perhaps not overt yet continue to manifest. What are the implications of the zombie's arc from a particular human being targeted for domination by a sorcerer to a living-dead horde created by radiation or epidemic? "Texts" may include: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Edgar Allan Poe, "The Man Who Was Used Up"; H.P. Lovecraft, "Herbert West--Re-Animator"; Zora Neale Hurston, Tell My Horse; Victor Halperin, dir., White Zombie; George Romero, dir., Dead series; Edgar Wright, dir., Shaun of the Dead; Alejandro Brugués, dir., Juan de los Muertos; Colm McCarthy, dir., The Girl with All the Gifts; Colson Whitehead, Zone One; Jordan Peele, dir., Get Out. Fulfills the Global and Minority Literatures requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hickman, Jared W
  • Room: Gilman 17 Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

British Literature: 18th Century to the Prese
AS.060.212 (02)

A survey of major authors such as Wordsworth, Keats, Austen, Tennyson, Dickens, Wilde, Woolf, Joyce, and Rushdie. Substantial attention to formal conventions as well as stylistic innovation, to aesthetic value as well as social meaning.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Hodson 316 Gilman 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/16
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of Work
AS.060.114 (27)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Begg, Aaron Jared
  • Room: Gilman 413  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Large Novels
AS.060.304 (01)

This course will look at novels that are not only large in size, but which also think about the meaning and methods of trying to capture huge segments of the world into a piece of art. How much can be fit into a novel? What is gained and what is lost? How large is too large? We will read Charles Dickens's Bleak House, Lev Tolstoy's War and Peace, and Herman Melville's Moby Dick.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Ames 234  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Zombies
AS.060.216 (01)

This lecture survey will attempt to answer why the zombie has become such a fixture in contemporary literature and cinema. We will track this figure across its many incarnations--from its late-eighteenth-century appearance in ethnographic fictions growing out of the modern cultures of racialized slavery in the Americas right up to twenty-first-century Hollywood blockbusters in which the origins of the figure in the cultures of racialized slavery are perhaps not overt yet continue to manifest. What are the implications of the zombie's arc from a particular human being targeted for domination by a sorcerer to a living-dead horde created by radiation or epidemic? "Texts" may include: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Edgar Allan Poe, "The Man Who Was Used Up"; H.P. Lovecraft, "Herbert West--Re-Animator"; Zora Neale Hurston, Tell My Horse; Victor Halperin, dir., White Zombie; George Romero, dir., Dead series; Edgar Wright, dir., Shaun of the Dead; Alejandro Brugués, dir., Juan de los Muertos; Colm McCarthy, dir., The Girl with All the Gifts; Colson Whitehead, Zone One; Jordan Peele, dir., Get Out. Fulfills the Global and Minority Literatures requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Hickman, Jared W
  • Room: Gilman 17 Maryland 104
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

British Literature: 18th Century to the Prese
AS.060.212 (01)

A survey of major authors such as Wordsworth, Keats, Austen, Tennyson, Dickens, Wilde, Woolf, Joyce, and Rushdie. Substantial attention to formal conventions as well as stylistic innovation, to aesthetic value as well as social meaning.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Hodson 316 Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Literature and Visual Art
AS.060.169 (01)

We’ll glance at the history of the relations between painting and literature, before turning to the art of the past 200 years. What has drawn writers to place their powers against those of painters (in particular)? How have they managed the comparisons? How might we understand the distinctive powers and limitations of these two modes of responding to human experience? While we may have an exam, writing assignments will constitute most of your grade.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Miller, Andrew
  • Room: Hodson 305  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Contemporary Novel of Ideas
AS.060.342 (01)

The novel of ideas is often traced to 18th century French or 19th century Russian writing, but it has come broadly to signify works of robust philosophical contemplation. The inherently slippery term seems to indicate a work in which “form” is subsidiary to “content,” or at least, in which narrative structures adapt to prioritize thought rather than style, image, or even character. But how, exactly, and about what, do novels “think?” In large part, the novel of ideas is now conflated with a rote and recognizable brand of social realism. This course asks what might qualify as a novel of ideas today, both in terms of the novel’s changing relation to geographical space (and thereby the formal spaces in which philosophy might lurk), and of the particular “ideas” it critiques or puts forth. We will read novelists including J.M. Coetzee, Marlene van Niekerk, Jonathan Franzen, Teju Cole, and Ronan Bennett within a longer literary-philosophical tradition, with reference to works such as Candide, War and Peace, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, and Kierkegaard’s Diary of a Seducer.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room: Bloomberg 274  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.060.220 (01)Clint Eastwood, Race and the American WesternMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJackson, Lawrence PGilman 55
Hodson 303
ENGL-LEC
AS.060.220 (02)Clint Eastwood, Race and the American WesternMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMJackson, Lawrence PGilman 55
 
ENGL-LEC
AS.060.365 (01)Malcolm and Martin: An Intro to the Lives and Thought of Two Icons of the Black Freedom StruggleT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Lawrence PGilman 77
 
ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.060.382 (01)Jewish American LiteratureMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStreim, Alexander Michael (Alex) 
 
AS.060.388 (01)Old World/New World WomenM 3:00PM - 5:30PMAchinstein, SharonShaffer 304
 
AS.100.240 (01)American Cultural CriticismT 3:00PM - 5:30PMHawkey, Chloe IGilman 219
 
HIST-US
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMPomeranzev, PeterSmokler Center 301
 
INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.213.321 (01)Bodies and PleasuresTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMPahl, KatrinGilman 377
 
AS.225.318 (01)21st Century Female PlaywrightsTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMDenithorne, Margaret (Margaret)Merrick 105
 
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNurhussein, NadiaMaryland 217
 
ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.363.226 (01)Women writers and the sonnet from the European Renaissance to the Harlem RenaissanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPatton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)Gilman 313
 
AS.060.114 (01)Expository Writing: Writing about a Film - The Tragedy of MacbethMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMO'Connor, Marie T (Marisa)Maryland 114
 
AS.060.114 (04)Expository Writing: Vaccines, Science, and ValuesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMWilbanks, RebeccaCroft Hall G02
 
AS.001.134 (01)FYS: Great Books at Hopkins - a closer readingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPatton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)Gilman 134
 
AS.060.100 (01)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBrodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy (Anne-Elizabeth)Gilman 10
 
AS.060.100 (02)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBrodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy (Anne-Elizabeth)Gilman 10
 
AS.060.107 (01)Introduction to Literary StudyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Jeanne-MarieShaffer 300
 
AS.060.107 (02)Introduction to Literary StudyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMAchinstein, SharonGilman 119
 
AS.060.114 (02)Expository Writing: Repairing the ‘Highway to NowhereMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMSpeller, Morris Elsmere Longley (Mo)MSE Library D1
 
AS.060.114 (03)Expository Writing: Repairing the ‘Highway to NowhereMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMSpeller, Morris Elsmere Longley (Mo)MSE Library D1
 
AS.060.114 (05)Expository Writing: Shakespeare’s Richard III and DisabilityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBest, Royce LeeGilman 217
 
AS.060.114 (07)Expository Writing: The Cost of Free Speech?MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMOppel, GeorgeGilman 134
 
AS.060.114 (06)Expository Writing: Shakespeare’s Richard III and DisabilityMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMBest, Royce Lee 
 
AS.060.114 (08)Expository Writing: The Cost of Free Speech?MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMOppel, GeorgeGilman 134
 
AS.060.114 (10)Expository Writing: Reintroduction to WritingMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMPavesich, Matthew 
 
AS.060.114 (09)Expository Writing: Who Writes History?MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMWaller, Jill SMaryland 104
 
AS.060.114 (14)Expository Writing: Who/What/When/Where/Why?TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMRoss, Sarah CatherineGilman 413
 
AS.060.114 (19)Expository Writing: Swamp ThingsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDubay, Noelle VictoriaGilman 217
 
AS.060.114 (18)Expository Writing: Revenge and MoralityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLewis, Alexander (Alex)Smokler Center 301
 
AS.060.114 (15)Expository Writing: Who/What/When/Where/Why?TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRoss, Sarah CatherineGilman 413
 
AS.060.114 (22)Expository Writing: The Politics of PopTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHuttner, Tobias ReedGilman 313
 
AS.060.114 (26)Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of WorkTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBegg, Aaron JaredGilman 413
 
AS.060.114 (23)Expository Writing: Exploring the Philosophy of LoveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKoullas, Sandy GillianGilman 377
 
AS.060.114 (17)Expository Writing: Stories from the American SouthTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMMurphy, Jamison FKrieger 304
 
AS.060.114 (11)Expository Writing: What Do We Owe to AnimalsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMPowell, Kevin Matthew (Kevin)Bloomberg 276
 
AS.060.114 (20)Expository Writing: Swamp ThingsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDubay, Noelle Victoria 
 
AS.060.114 (21)Expository Writing: The Politics of PopTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHuttner, Tobias ReedGilman 313
 
AS.060.114 (24)Expository Writing: Exploring the Philosophy of LoveTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKoullas, Sandy GillianGilman 377
 
AS.060.114 (25)Expository Writing: Contemporary American Short StoriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBerger, Donald WGilman 134
 
AS.060.114 (12)Expository Writing: Policing the PoliceMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMCarter, BryanGilman 134
 
AS.060.114 (16)Expository Writing: Witchcraft and PowerTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMCutler, Sylvia (Sylvia)Smokler Center Library
 
AS.060.366 (01)Happily Ever After: Fantasies of Nineteenth-Century RomanceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMakonnen, Atesede Retta (Sede)Gilman 130D
 
AS.060.343 (01)Marxism and LiteratureF 1:30PM - 4:00PMNealon, Christopher (Chris)Gilman 400
 
AS.060.355 (01)Poetry and Politics TodayM 1:30PM - 4:00PMNealon, Christopher (Chris)Shaffer 100
 
AS.060.363 (01)Henry JamesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMao, DouglasShaffer 304
 
AS.060.376 (01)Decolonizing Early Modern Mathematics: Reading Nature’s LanguageMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDoherty, Nathanael JosephMaryland 114
 
AS.060.377 (01)Edmund Spenser's Fairie QueeneT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDaniel, AndrewGilman 388
 
ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.114 (28)Expository Writing: Science Fiction and Climate CatastropheTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMShipko, David Thomas, Jr.Krieger Laverty
 
AS.060.114 (30)Expository Writing: Why We LaughMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMTinkle, Robert EGilman 119
 
AS.060.216 (02)ZombiesMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHickman, Jared WGilman 17
Gilman 377
ENGL-LEC
AS.060.212 (02)British Literature: 18th Century to the PreseMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRosenthal, Jesse KarlHodson 316
Gilman 217
ENGL-LEC
AS.060.114 (27)Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of WorkTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBegg, Aaron JaredGilman 413
 
AS.060.304 (01)Large NovelsTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMRosenthal, Jesse KarlAmes 234
 
AS.060.216 (01)ZombiesMW 9:00AM - 9:50AM, F 9:00AM - 9:50AMHickman, Jared WGilman 17
Maryland 104
ENGL-LEC
AS.060.212 (01)British Literature: 18th Century to the PreseMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRosenthal, Jesse KarlHodson 316
Gilman 17
ENGL-LEC
AS.060.169 (01)Literature and Visual ArtM 3:00PM - 5:30PMMiller, AndrewHodson 305
 
AS.060.342 (01)Contemporary Novel of IdeasW 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Jeanne-MarieBloomberg 274