Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Indigenous Science Fiction: (Re)making Worlds
AS.060.142 (01)

This discussion-based seminar will survey science fiction written by indigenous authors in what are now the United States, Canada, and Australia. We will investigate by what means and to what ends this particular genre has been taken up by indigenous peoples both to reflect on their settler-colonial pasts and presents and to imagine decolonial futures. Texts may include: Leslie Marmon Silko, Almanac of the Dead; William Sanders, "The Undiscovered"; Daniel Heath Justice, The Way of Thorn and Thunder; Blake Hausman, Riding the Trail of Tears; Waubgeshig Rice, Moon of the Crusted Snow; Claire Coleman, Terra Nullius; Tanya Tagaq, Split Tooth. Fulfills the Global and Minority Literatures requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hickman, Jared W
  • Room: Krieger 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Shakespeare
AS.060.207 (02)

Reading the major comedies, histories and tragedies alongside the narrative poem “Venus and Adonis” and the sonnets, this survey course considers Shakespeare’s hybrid career as poet and playwright. Pre 1800 course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew, Lee, Sung Mey
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800

The Essay Form and Creative Non-Fiction
AS.060.308 (01)

We’ll focus on the essay form, with special attention to recent creative non-fiction that responds to art and literature itself. Theoretical, stylistic, and formal issues will all be considered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Miller, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 130D
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Nineteenth Century British Novel
AS.060.265 (02)

Reading major novelists from the nineteenth century including Austen, C. Brontë, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and Conrad. We will pay attention to formal conventions, and relation to social and historical context.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Franchi, Sophia A, Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Shakespeare
AS.060.207 (01)

Reading the major comedies, histories and tragedies alongside the narrative poem “Venus and Adonis” and the sonnets, this survey course considers Shakespeare’s hybrid career as poet and playwright. Pre 1800 course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew, Oliver, Xavier A
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800

Nineteenth Century British Novel
AS.060.265 (01)

Reading major novelists from the nineteenth century including Austen, C. Brontë, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and Conrad. We will pay attention to formal conventions, and relation to social and historical context.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Dubay, Noelle Victoria, Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Shakespeare
AS.060.207 (03)

Reading the major comedies, histories and tragedies alongside the narrative poem “Venus and Adonis” and the sonnets, this survey course considers Shakespeare’s hybrid career as poet and playwright. Pre 1800 course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Best, Royce Lee, Daniel, Andrew
  • Room: Hodson 213
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800

Literature in the Age of Mass Incarceration
AS.060.311 (01)

The United States in 2018 held more than two million people behind bars, and each year it imprisons more people per capita than any other nation in the world. Understood in terms of “mass incarceration,” a “new Jim Crow,” or “carceral capitalism,” scholars and activists have come increasingly to characterize contemporary U.S. society in light of these facts. Despite this, there has been only sporadic attention within literary studies to the prison as a driving force in American literature, even as canonical works in world literature, from Antigone to Les Misérables to Native Son, feature prominent prison plots. This course in American literature aims to examine how writers, both within and beyond the walls of the prison, have responded to the shifting role of incarceration in the U.S. We will read examples of both “prison literature” and literature that thematizes the prison as an institution across the period of explosive growth in imprisoned populations in the U.S. We will ask what kinds of writing—what genres, moods, styles, and forms—emerge from experiences of incarceration and the literary history of its representation. And we will investigate how a focus on the history of the prison might reshape readings in American literature. Finally, we will consider the role of writing and reading in political struggles against racism, militarism, and heteropatriarchy in the U.S. By developing a critical account of the prison through the kaleidoscope of literature, we will look to develop tools to better understand a central feature of contemporary social life in the U.S. Authors covered may include: Chester Himes, Malcolm X, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Audre Lorde, Piper Kerman, Mohamedu Ould Slahi, and Colson Whitehead, among others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Huttner, Tobias Reed
  • Room: Gilman 377
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Doctors Without Borders: Literature, Medicine, and the Human Condition
AS.060.137 (01)

Doctors play a significant role in shaping literary history as both writers and fictional subjects. From Chekhov to Sherlock Holmes, W. Somerset Maugham to Middlemarch, medical practice is imagined to bestow a privileged understanding of humanity in confrontation with questions of life and death. This course explores how writing about medicine connects long-established themes of mortality, authority, and ways of knowing to timely questions of global migration, cultural contact, and social justice. We will read literary writing by physicians as well as writing that depicts their work in detail, by authors including Nawal El Saadawi, Atul Gawande, Abraham Verghese, Damon Galgut, and Taiye Selasi.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room: Shriver Hall Board Room
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Bad Mothers: Nineteenth-Century Novels and Contemporary Theories of Maternity
AS.060.312 (01)

What makes a “bad” mother? Are bad mothers doomed to be bad, or are they produced by their circumstances? Why did so many nineteenth-century texts fixate on the different ways in which maternity could be flawed? This course pursues these questions in order to consider the psychology and politics of motherhood, an identity and a performance that for some has been synonymous with womanhood itself. Even as our primary texts naturalize and idealize motherhood, they encounter again and again maternity’s instability, its undesirability, its pain, its banality, and its failures. To dive into these questions, we will turn to twentieth- and twenty-first century theorists—including Sigmund Freud, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Jacqueline Rose, and bell hooks—for their insights about how individuals and societies think about mothers. Starting with maternal archetypes like the Grimms’ Evil Stepmother and the classical infanticide Medea, our primary texts will include works by Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Thomas Hardy, Virginia Woolf, Amy Tan, and at least one recent film/TV episode (TBD). Assignments include short reflections, one presentation, and one final research paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Ross, Sarah Catherine
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Social Media Fictions
AS.060.314 (01)

Writers around the world are now searching for ways to incorporate new modes of social interaction - e.g. Facebook, Twitter, text messaging, and Skype - into their print work. This course explores the various techniques they have adopted for this purpose, with an eye to critically evaluating their implications for narrative structure and its "reality effect." From Teju Cole's very public experiments with the Twitter novel to a Zimbabwean writer's attempt to capture plot turns through SMS, we will discuss the ways in which narrative is helped or hindered by the ubiquity of social media. Writers studied will include Tendai Huchu, Zadie Smith, Jonathan Franzen, and Eben Venter.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literature and Anti-Slavery in the Caribbean and Beyond
AS.060.321 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the texts and rhetoric of the movement to abolish slavery in the Caribbean. Our exploration of the literary and discursive patterns that bind the struggle against slavery in this diverse region (including the British West Indies, Cuba, and Haiti) will be guided by several questions. How did the formerly enslaved represent their experiences and level critiques against the slave system? What arguments did abolitionists - black and white, enslaved and free - make against slavery, and how did they imagine emancipation? What techniques do novelists, poets, and other artists use to represent the horrors of slavery and emancipatory struggles? To explore these and other problems, this class focuses on novels, poems, images, films, political treatises and first-person histories produced (mainly) by individuals who had either experienced Caribbean slavery or participated in the network of Transatlantic abolition. These texts to chart a complex journey, from the middle passage and eighteenth-century plantation life to international abolition, resistance to slavery, and the memories of racial slavery. The final section considers how the cultural legacy of Caribbean slavery and antislavery are taken up by artists from the Harlem Renaissance and various anti-colonial movements, and more recently by critics of mass incarceration in the US. Authors include, among others: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Esteban Montejo, Cirilo Villaverde, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Langston Hughes, Aimé Césaire, and Ava DuVernay (all texts will be available in English).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Loker, Evan
  • Room: Gilman 10
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology, literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/40
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, ENGL-PR1800

Early American Literature
AS.060.391 (01)

This course is an introduction to literatures drawn from across the Americas, although primarily the British North American colonies that would eventually become the United States, from first contact in 1492 up through the American wars of independence. Our readings are roughly organized according to chronology and genre. We will think about the adapted and emergent generic forms through which “the New World” was ongoingly invented, including genres like the Indian captivity narrative and the slave narrative that arguably make their debut in world literary history in the Americas during this time frame. We will conclude by attending to the rather late emergence of the novel in American literary history, reading four novels that appeared in the early US national period. The objective of the course is simply to contextualize and analyze a wide array of texts, each of which richly rewards the engaged reader, in order to trace the origins of American literatures. Course texts may include contact narratives (Columbus, Caminha, Smith, Hennepin); conquest narratives (Mather, Las Casas, Poma de Ayala); Indian captivity narratives (Cabeza de Vaca, Rowlandson, Staden); slave narratives (Gronniosaw, Jea, Cugoano); revolutionary polemics (Paine, Bolívar); and the earliest American novels: William Hill Brown, The Power of Sympathy; Hannah Webster Foster, The Coquette; Leonora Sansay, Secret History or, the Horrors of Santo Domingo; Charles Brockden Brown, Arthur Mervyn. Fulfills the pre-1800 requirement.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hickman, Jared W
  • Room: Bloomberg 178
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800, ENGL-GLOBAL

Transfiguring the Renaissance
AS.060.406 (01)

Tracing the poetics of bodily transformation then and now, this course puts early modern literature into dialogue with medical epistemologies of the sexed body and contemporary critical reflections upon transgender experience, embodiment and transition. Early modern texts might include Arthur Golding’s translation of Ovid’s “Metamorphosis”, John Lyly’s “Gallathea”, Francis Beaumont’s “Salmacis and Hermaphroditus”, Ben Jonson’s “Epicoene, or The Silent Woman”, Middleton & Dekker’s “The Roaring Girl” and John Milton’s “Paradise Lost.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Marxism and Literature
AS.060.343 (01)

This course will provide a survey of some of the concepts in Marx’s work, especially those to be found in volume 1 of Capital, that might help us get a clearer sense of 21st-century politics and culture. We will move outward from reading Marx to reading recent and classic texts in the Marxist critical tradition. We will discuss explicitly economic ideas about commodities, surplus value, and concrete and abstract labor, as well as historical and political ideas like “primitive accumulation” and the “uneven and combined development” of nations. We will think about what reading Marx and the Marxist tradition can help us see about colonialism, gender, race, technology, and the environment, as well as how it can clarify the character of economic crises. Toward the end of the term we will turn to literary texts, not necessarily “Marxist” themselves, to help us understand important questions that Marxism cannot tackle by itself, like: who are people, anyway? What do they hope for, when they write? Is there a Marxist idea of beauty, and is it different than everybody else’s? Along with Marx, and anti-colonial, anti-racist and feminist writers in the Marxist tradition, we’ll read work by the novelist NK Jemisin, and the poet Stephanie Young.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Nealon, Christopher
  • Room: Gilman 130D
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Literary Modernism
AS.213.328 (01)

Taught in English. German Literary Modernism focuses on modernist works of literature between 1900-1930, considering central modernist authors against the backdrop of dramatic changes and events in European culture and society, including urbanization, technological change, the First World War, and social and artistic movements. Students will engage literary works--by such authors as Kafka, Rilke, Hofmannsthal and Thomas Mann--that express a sense of crisis about modern life, or provoke questions about the nature of reality, the human self, the reliability of perception, and the possibilities of language and art. ​Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL

Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury
AS.060.348 (01)

An exploration of the achievements and investments of one of the most influential coteries in the history of Britain. In addition to delving into key fictions by Virginia Woolf, we will examine novels by Leonard Woolf and E. M. Forster, art criticism by Roger Fry and Clive Bell, biographical essays by Lytton Strachey, economic writings by John Maynard Keynes, and poetry by T. S. Eliot.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room: Smokler Center 301
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and Culture
AS.211.361 (01)

In this course we will study and analyze the notion of dissent in Israeli society and culture on its various literary and artistic forms. We will examine the emergence and the formation of various political and social protest movements, such as the Israeli Black Panthers, Israeli feminism and the 2011 Social Justice protest. We will discuss at length the history and the nature of dissent in the military and in relation to Israeli wars and will track changes in these relation. Significant portion of the course will be dedicated to the literary, cinematic and artistic aspects of Israeli protest and their influence on Israeli discourse. We will explore the nature and role of specific genres and media such as the Israeli satire, Israeli television, newspaper op-ed and the recent emergence of social media. Students wishing to work in English exclusively for 3 credits should enroll in section one. Students who are fluent in Hebrew and are wishing to attend an additional hour-long Hebrew discussion session per week with Professor Cohen (time TBD in consultation with enrolled students) for 4 credits should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan England
AS.363.445 (01)

If Shakespeare had a sister who went to London to be a writer, what would she write? Virginia Woolf’s account of the thwarted career of Shakespeare’s hypothetical sister, Judith, in A Room of One’s Own frames our reading of plays and poetry by Shakespeare and contemporary women writers, including Isabella Whitney, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Sidney, Aemelia Lanyer, and Mary Wroth. Working within a selected historical context, students will create fictional biographies of “Judith Shakespeare,” including her perspective on our identified authors and a sample or description of Judith’s own literary accomplishments. Secondary course readings will reflect contemporary economic, political, and religious contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Shaffer 304
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

21st Century Female Playwrights
AS.225.318 (01)

This is a writing intensive class exploring the current wealth of women playwrights, including Pulitzer Prize winners: Wendy Wasserstein, Paula Vogel, Lynn Nottage, and Jackie Sibblies Drury (2019 Prize for FAIRVIEW). We will discuss Script Analysis and read (and see) plays by numerous writers including Claire Barron, Kia Corthron, Theresa Rebeck, Sarah Ruhl, Danai Gurira, Caleen Sinnette Jennings, and Hansol Jung. This class will include a mid-term and a Final Paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 8:30PM
  • Instructor: Denithorne, Margaret
  • Room: Merrick 105
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing Whiteness
AS.100.354 (01)

This course will turn to known and not-so-known black writers during the early to mid-twentieth century who defied literary expectation and wrote stories that featured or focused on whiteness. We will consider what whiteness offered black writers and the political work that their literary experimentations did for a white American publishing industry.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room: Hodson 316
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Nature and Ecology in German Literature and Thought
AS.213.446 (01)

Nature and Ecology in German Literature and Thought considers the understanding and representation of the natural world in literary works and aesthetic theory from the 18th to the 20th centuries. We will consider such topics as poetic reverence for nature, anthropocentric representations of nature in literature, the thematization of landscape, the representation of animal life, the distinction between the human and animal as explored by literary writers, and ecologically-oriented critique of human consciousness. Readings may include works by such writers and thinkers as Goethe, Kant, Hölderlin, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Rilke, and Kafka, and more recent works of literary ecocriticism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Gilman 313
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Fantasy and Failure: Inventing Worlds in the English Renaissance
AS.060.329 (01)

What did the English Renaissance think humans were capable of? What worlds could they build, how far could they travel, and what limits could they transgress? In his Oration on the Dignity of Man, Pico della Mirandola asserted that, in contrast to vegetables, animals, or even angels, “man is granted to have what he chooses, to be what he wills to be.” While Renaissance humanism was enthusiastic about the seemingly limitless abilities of the “Renaissance man,” English literature of the period from roughly 1500-1700 is often more skeptical of this optimism. If humans could activate their divine potential and achieve godlike status, they were still always in danger of regressing into one of the baser states of animality or vegetation. This course examines literary explorations of the ways that individual ambition fails or the ideal society proves unattainable. The course is divided into three units: utopia and early science fiction, theater, and poetry. Topics for discussion may include political ambition, gender inequality, ecological dangers, and Renaissance magic; authors will include Thomas More, Margaret Cavendish, William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Amelia Lanyer, and John Donne, among others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Tinkle, Robert E
  • Room: Hodson 315
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Thomas Pynchon
AS.060.397 (01)

Intensive reading of two major Pynchon novels, along with theories of modernity, postmodernity, etc.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Nealon, Christopher
  • Room: Gilman 388
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course investigates recent debates about being a person in literature and law. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Although our explorations will be focused on these questions, the genre of materials examined will be wide-ranging (including legal essays, philosophy, contemporary novels, and film). Texts will include novels by William Gibson and Lydia Millet, essays by John Dewey and Daniel Dennett, and films such as Ex Machinaand Her.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levi, Jacob Ezra, Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Scribbling Women in the Literary Archive
AS.389.346 (01)

Students examine select texts and archival materials related to Emily Dickinson, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Edith Wharton, Ida B. Wells, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sui Sin Far, Alice Duer Miller, and Zora Neale Hurston. Students interrogate how these writers navigated the constraints of gender, as informed by race and class, in the decades before and after the 19th Amendment and consider literary collecting in relation to gendered cultural politics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Dean, Gabrielle
  • Room: BLC Macksey
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.060.142 (01)Indigenous Science Fiction: (Re)making WorldsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHickman, Jared WKrieger 111
AS.060.207 (02)ShakespeareMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMDaniel, Andrew, Lee, Sung MeyHodson 213ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.308 (01)The Essay Form and Creative Non-FictionW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMiller, AndrewGilman 130D
AS.060.265 (02)Nineteenth Century British NovelMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFranchi, Sophia A, Rosenthal, Jesse KarlGilman 132ENGL-LEC
AS.060.207 (01)ShakespeareMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMDaniel, Andrew, Oliver, Xavier AHodson 213ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.265 (01)Nineteenth Century British NovelMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMDubay, Noelle Victoria, Rosenthal, Jesse KarlGilman 132ENGL-LEC
AS.060.207 (03)ShakespeareMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMBest, Royce Lee, Daniel, AndrewHodson 213ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.311 (01)Literature in the Age of Mass IncarcerationT 4:30PM - 7:00PMHuttner, Tobias ReedGilman 377
AS.060.137 (01)Doctors Without Borders: Literature, Medicine, and the Human ConditionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Jeanne-MarieShriver Hall Board Room
AS.060.312 (01)Bad Mothers: Nineteenth-Century Novels and Contemporary Theories of MaternityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMRoss, Sarah CatherineGilman 400
AS.060.314 (01)Social Media FictionsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Jeanne-MarieKrieger 205
AS.060.321 (01)Literature and Anti-Slavery in the Caribbean and BeyondW 4:00PM - 6:30PMLoker, EvanGilman 10ENGL-PR1800
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStephens, Walter EGilman 132GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.391 (01)Early American LiteratureM 1:30PM - 4:00PMHickman, Jared WBloomberg 178ENGL-PR1800, ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.060.406 (01)Transfiguring the RenaissanceTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMDaniel, AndrewKrieger 306
AS.060.343 (01)Marxism and LiteratureTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMNealon, ChristopherGilman 130D
AS.213.328 (01)German Literary ModernismTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaGilman 313GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL
AS.060.348 (01)Virginia Woolf and BloomsburyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMao, DouglasSmokler Center 301
AS.211.361 (01)Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaKrieger 302INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.363.445 (01)Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan EnglandW 1:30PM - 4:00PMPatton, ElizabethShaffer 304ENGL-PR1800
AS.225.318 (01)21st Century Female PlaywrightsT 6:00PM - 8:30PMDenithorne, MargaretMerrick 105
AS.100.354 (01)Playing in the White: Black Writers, the Literary Colorline and Writing WhitenessTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani THodson 316HIST-US
AS.213.446 (01)Nature and Ecology in German Literature and ThoughtT 3:00PM - 5:30PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaGilman 313GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.060.329 (01)Fantasy and Failure: Inventing Worlds in the English RenaissanceM 4:00PM - 6:30PMTinkle, Robert EHodson 315ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.397 (01)Thomas PynchonT 1:30PM - 3:50PMNealon, ChristopherGilman 388
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevi, Jacob Ezra, Siraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
AS.389.346 (01)Scribbling Women in the Literary ArchiveM 3:00PM - 5:30PMDean, GabrielleBLC Macksey

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

William Faulkner, Race, and Southern Fiction
AS.060.147 (11)

This course will introduce students to debates in Southern American literary studies around questions of race and politics. The course will center around a reading of William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! as well as several other pieces of Southern short fiction and literary criticism. We will use these texts to explore the history and transformations of racial discourses in 19th and 20th century America, with close attention to how they influence the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 11:30AM
  • Instructor: Murphy, Jamison F
  • Room: Gilman 130D
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Science Fiction and Climate Change
AS.060.127 (21)

This course will examine representations of and confrontations with climate change in science fiction. Special focus will be given to indigenous futurisms as uniquely valuable perspectives on the climate crisis. We will examine these narratives alongside climate change discourse, literary theory, and literary criticism to develop an understanding of the difficulties and stakes of imaginatively rendering climate change through speculative frameworks, and to explore the relationships between climate change, neoliberal capitalism, and settler colonialism.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 11:30AM
  • Instructor: Shipko, David Thomas, Jr.
  • Room: Gilman 130D
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Tolkien: Reading and Writing Myth
AS.060.190 (21)

This course considers the works of J.R.R. Tolkien next to his ancient and medieval sources. Beginning with Tolkien’s own translation of Beowulf, we will read several European sagas, myths, and epics next to Tolkien’s own criticism, commentary, and familiar letters. Of Tolkien’s original works of fiction, we will read The Hobbit and The Silmarillion with these earlier texts at hand in order to understand how Tolkien’s way of writing myth arises from his way of reading.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:00PM - 3:30PM
  • Instructor: McClurkin, Daniel Thomas
  • Room: Gilman 130D
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Modern and Contempory Irish Literature
AS.060.170 (11)

This course will focus on texts written and performed by Irish authors and politicians from roughly 1907-2018. Using the Irish War of Independence and the current Brexit crisis as loose bookends, this course looks at Irish poetry, fiction, drama, film, and political texts written throughout the 20th and 21st century in order to substantiate the history of Anglo-Irish relations, the inception and afterlife of the Northern Irish Troubles, and Ireland’s political and economic state as it stands nearly a century after the Irish Revolutionary Period.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:00PM - 3:30PM
  • Instructor: McClurkin, Daniel Thomas
  • Room: Krieger 309
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Science of Science Fiction: Experiments in Literature
AS.060.134 (11)

Faster-than-light travel, non-linear alien languages, cloning, nanotechnology, and the colonization of outer space: this course introduces students to science fiction as a literature of ideas. We will sample short stories, novels, and films that use principles in physics, anthropology, and other disciplines to imagine future worlds and the human beings who inhabit them. Along the way, we will consider the history of the genre and the wider social significance of technology, literary form, and human imagination.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:00PM - 3:30PM
  • Instructor: Cram, Mitchell Allan
  • Room: Gilman 130D
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.060.147 (11)William Faulkner, Race, and Southern FictionMWF 9:00AM - 11:30AMMurphy, Jamison FGilman 130D
AS.060.127 (21)Science Fiction and Climate ChangeMWF 9:00AM - 11:30AMShipko, David Thomas, Jr.Gilman 130D
AS.060.190 (21)Tolkien: Reading and Writing MythMWF 1:00PM - 3:30PMMcClurkin, Daniel ThomasGilman 130D
AS.060.170 (11)Modern and Contempory Irish LiteratureMWF 1:00PM - 3:30PMMcClurkin, Daniel ThomasKrieger 309
AS.060.134 (11)The Science of Science Fiction: Experiments in LiteratureMWF 1:00PM - 3:30PMCram, Mitchell AllanGilman 130D