Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: What is the Common Good?
AS.001.100 (01)

What is "the common good"? How do individuals consider this idea, this question, and how are societies led, or misled, by its pursuit? Together, we will explore sources from a range of perspectives: What can the story of Noah, for example, teach us about the question of the common good? Or the engineering of Baltimore public transportation, the notion of meritocracy in higher education, access to vaccines, the perniciousness of pandemics, prohibition of nuclear weapons, or data sharing among scientists? Drawing from movies, interviews, and readings (authors include Rachel Carson, James Baldwin, Bong Joon-ho, Spike Lee, Michael Sandel, and more), this course is as much about how we ask and interrogate hard questions as it is about the answers themselves. Engaging deeply with the sources and each other, students will discuss the texts in class, write short responses, and give occasional oral presentations. The course will culminate in a final, collaborative research project that seeks to map the common good and move the conversation forward.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 3:30PM
  • Instructor: Watters, Aliza
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (01)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: O'Connor, Marie T (Marisa)
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (02)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Brodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (03)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Brodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy
  • Room: Gilman 308  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (07)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Koullas, Sandy Gillian
  • Room: Gilman 313  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (08)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Koullas, Sandy Gillian
  • Room: Gilman 10  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Emotion(s)
AS.060.113 (01)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Asuni, Michele
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Repairing the “Highway to Nowhere”
AS.060.113 (02)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Speller, Morris Elsmere Longley (Mo)
  • Room: Bloomberg 168  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Policing the Police
AS.060.113 (03)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 8:30AM - 9:45AM
  • Instructor: Carter, Bryan
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Shakespeare’s Richard III and Disability
AS.060.113 (04)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Best, Royce Lee
  • Room: Krieger 170  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Vaccines, Science, and Values
AS.060.113 (05)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Wilbanks, Rebecca
  • Room: Shaffer 300  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Politics and Violence
AS.060.113 (06)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Oppel, George
  • Room: Maryland 309  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Politics and Violence
AS.060.113 (07)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Oppel, George
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Who Writes History?
AS.060.113 (08)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Waller, Jill S
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The “Dark Side” of Progress
AS.060.113 (09)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Ross, Sarah Catherine
  • Room: Bloomberg 278  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Shakespeare’s Richard III and Disability
AS.060.113 (10)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Best, Royce Lee
  • Room: Gilman 217  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Witchcraft and Power
AS.060.113 (11)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Cutler, Sylvia (Sylvia)
  • Room: Latrobe 120  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Who Owns the Past?
AS.060.113 (12)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Essam, Richard James Llewellyn
  • Room: BLC 5015  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of Work
AS.060.113 (13)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Begg, Aaron Jared
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The “Dark Side” of Progress
AS.060.113 (14)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Ross, Sarah Catherine
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Structural Injustice
AS.060.113 (15)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Masin-Peters, Jonathan (Jon)
  • Room: Smokler Center 213  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Swamp Things
AS.060.113 (16)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Dubay, Noelle Victoria
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Contemporary American Short Stories
AS.060.113 (17)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Berger, Donald W
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Science Fiction and Climate Catastrophe
AS.060.113 (18)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Shipko, David Thomas, Jr.
  • Room: Hodson 315  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of Work
AS.060.113 (19)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Begg, Aaron Jared
  • Room: Maryland 217  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Euthanasia and Cultural Conceptions of a “Good Death”
AS.060.113 (20)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Chase, Mikaela Ondine (Miki)
  • Room: Maryland 202  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Swamp Things
AS.060.113 (21)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dubay, Noelle Victoria
  • Room: Jenkins 102  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: What Do We Owe to Animals?
AS.060.113 (22)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Powell, Kevin Matthew (Kevin)
  • Room: Gilman 377  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: No Justice No Peace?
AS.060.113 (23)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kirmizidag, Nur
  • Room: Gilman 134  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: A Right of Self-Defense?
AS.060.113 (24)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Lester, Quinn A (Quinn)
  • Room: Gilman 277  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Stories from the American South
AS.060.113 (25)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Murphy, Jamison F
  • Room: Gilman 130D  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:Repairing the “Highway to Nowhere”
AS.060.113 (26)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Speller, Morris Elsmere Longley (Mo)
  • Room: MSE Library Eisenberg  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and Beyond
AS.060.157 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the texts and rhetoric of the movement that abolished slavery in the Caribbean. Among other topics, we examine: how the formerly enslaved represented their experiences of slavery; how abolitionism emerged across the West Indies, Cuba, and Haiti; and the techniques artists used to imagine radical, post-slavery worlds. Authors include: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Esteban Montejo, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, and Aimé Césaire (all texts will be available in English).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Loker, Evan (Evan)
  • Room: Latrobe 120  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Crafting Race in 19th Century British Culture
AS.060.166 (01)

Race is a social construct – but how does society actually create that construct? “Crafting Race in 19th-Century British Culture” explores how the idea of race was developed, deployed, and reinforced through nineteenth-century British cultural objects. Students investigate how media like literature and art produce and replicate arguments about race that justified or fought against oppression. Alongside literary texts, students will also work with advertisements, paintings, and theatrical practice. We take an intersectional approach, thinking not only about race, but also the connections between gender, class, sexuality, and disability. What are the roots of problems we think of as exclusively modern, like whitewashing in media? How has racial thinking been passed down through time and across oceans? Ultimately, our investigation aims to provide insight to modern issues of race through a better understanding of social history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Makonnen, Atesede Retta (Sede)
  • Room: Gilman 130D  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

A Room of One's Own: Modernism and Privacy
AS.060.167 (01)

Modernism is often understood as having discovered new ways of rendering private, psychological life. Writers such as James Joyce and Virginia Woolf, for instance, wrote prose that gave its readers the feeling of being inside someone’s head. But these forays into new psychological interiors were composed within particular architectural arrangements, and described particular kinds of rooms. In this course, we will consider how access to or a lack of privacy – in Woolf’s phrase, “a room of one’s own” – shapes modernist literature. As the semester continues, we will see the resonances of “privacy” expand beyond its physical meaning to include emotional, identitarian, and cultural privacies. Novelists include Woolf, CLR James, Nella Larsen, and Willa Cather; poets include Gertrude Stein, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Streim, Alexander Michael
  • Room: Krieger Laverty  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Visions of the Home: Communes and Collective Living in American Culture
AS.060.168 (01)

In this course, we will examine stories of intentional and communal living, attending to the ways in which narratives of home life have been shaped by larger social and historical structures. We will read autobiographical narratives, collectively written guides to structure and etiquette, satirical novels, and science fiction in order to query what the possibilities and limits of the home are envisioned to be. We will consider, among other issues: gendered labor and queer kinship; the shifting economics of housing, real estate, and rent; the formation of neighbourhoods and local identities; questions of movement, immigration, citizenship, and race; the dynamics of interpersonal conflict in intimate spaces; and how questions of familial belonging and kinship affect one’s sense of home.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Giardini, Joseph Aurelio (Jo)
  • Room: Maryland 309  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

William Shakespeare
AS.060.207 (01)

Who was William Shakespeare, and what can his poems, histories, comedies and tragedies tell us about our overlap with, and divergences from, the early modern world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 132 Gilman 186
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

William Shakespeare
AS.060.207 (02)

Who was William Shakespeare, and what can his poems, histories, comedies and tragedies tell us about our overlap with, and divergences from, the early modern world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 132 Maryland 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Time Travel
AS.060.217 (01)

Why is time travel such a consistent and perplexing theme in literature and film over the last 150 years? Why is modernity so concerned with peeking backwards or forwards? This course will examine the history of time-travel fiction, from its beginning in utopian fiction through its box-office dominance in the 1980s, and into today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Hodson 311 Krieger 304
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM

Time Travel
AS.060.217 (02)

Why is time travel such a consistent and perplexing theme in literature and film over the last 150 years? Why is modernity so concerned with peeking backwards or forwards? This course will examine the history of time-travel fiction, from its beginning in utopian fiction through its box-office dominance in the 1980s, and into today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room: Hodson 311 Krieger 300
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM

The Modernist Novel: Consciousness and Crisis
AS.060.221 (01)

A course on key novels written in Britain or its former colonies between 1900 and 1960. Major attention to the meanings of modernism across the arts as well as innovations in prose fiction.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room: Ames 218 Krieger Laverty
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM

The Modernist Novel: Consciousness and Crisis
AS.060.221 (02)

A course on key novels written in Britain or its former colonies between 1900 and 1960. Major attention to the meanings of modernism across the arts as well as innovations in prose fiction.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room: Ames 218 MSE Library Eisenberg
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM

Literature of the Settler Revolution
AS.060.313 (01)

The nineteenth century saw the creation of an “Angloworld” as a result of what one historian has called “the settler revolution.” In perhaps the largest mass migration in human history, millions of English-speakers (and others) invaded Indigenous worlds in what have consequently come to be known as the United States, Canada, and Australia. This seminar offers an introduction to nineteenth-century Indigenous and settler Anglophone writing in the US, Canada, and Australia with a view to understanding the role of literature in inciting, interrogating, and resisting this settler revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hickman, Jared W
  • Room: Gilman 288  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Milton
AS.060.341 (01)

This class will study Milton’s poetry and prose across the whole of his writing career, with special attention to Paradise Lost, the great epic poem retelling the story of the fall of humankind. We will consider Milton’s literary background, his contemporary political and social milieu, as well as critical debates that surrounding the poet, who was accused of being ‘of the devil’s party.’ Pre-1800 course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room: Maryland 309  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Literature of the Sea
AS.060.354 (01)

In this course, we will read 19th- and 20th-century American and British literature about the sea, using an approach informed by recent scholarship in what has been called Blue Humanities or Oceanic Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room: Croft Hall B32  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Medicine in Renaissance Literature
AS.060.362 (01)

From quacks to plague, from humoralism to hypochondria, this course explores how early modern literature represents and occasionally satirizes medicine. Authors include Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Nashe, Browne and Moliere.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 400  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800, MSCH-HUM

Early/Modern/Cucks
AS.060.368 (01)

A cuckold (“cuck” for short) is a man whose wife cheats on him. Jokes about cuckolds and cuckoldry are everywhere in Renaissance literature (especially in Shakespeare), but by the 19th century, society had moved beyond such crude forms of humor. Or so we thought. In the last ten years, America has witnessed a shocking resurgence of cucks and cuckoldry, from online pornography to extremist right-wing discourse. In Early/Modern/Cucks we study the literature of this troubling obsession, reading a range of early modern authors from England, Italy, France, and Spain (all texts will be read in translation).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:15PM - 6:45PM
  • Instructor: Lewis, Alexander (Alex)
  • Room: Maryland 114  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, Queer
AS.211.362 (01)

How does what we learn and what we call knowledge matter? Is it clear what “knowledge” means? Does it have the same meaning historically, across different academic disciplines and in daily life? Never have such questions been more relevant than in these volatile times. This course offers a literary and theoretical inquiry into the matter of knowledge/s. Through works by authors from diverse, interdisciplinary traditions including German and American thought and literature, as well as critical, Black, feminist, and queer theory, we will address alternative epistemologies that operate with “partial” or “unfinished” models of knowledge. Thus, students will become familiar with difficult, influential material from various disciplines, while focusing less on judgment and more on dialogical aspects of knowing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Nitis, Maya
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Renaissance Witches and Demonology
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in medicine, theology, literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/50
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Media Theory
AS.213.407 (01)

German Media Theory is an advanced course for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, giving an introduction and overview of the specifically German version of Media Studies that first gained traction in the 1980s. The term media refers not just to mass media but more broadly to devices that process, transfer and store information, reaching from the alphabet that changed the culture of writing, or the printing press made famous as the foundation of the ‘Gutenberg galaxy’ to computers and smart phones dominating our current lives. In this course we will cut across disciplinary boundaries to explore the multifaceted roots and formations of German media theory which combine literary poststructuralism, histories of science and technology, psychoanalysis, cybernetics, art history, and philosophy among other fields. Readings include works by Friedrich Kittler, Bernhard Siegert, Cornelia Vismann, Wolfgang Ernst, Walter Benjamin, Niklas Luhmann, Michel Foucault, Marshall McLuhan and many others. The course will be taught in English and all readings will be available in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Pfannkuchen, Antje
  • Room: Gilman 418  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course explores recent debates on being a person in culture, law, and philosophy. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Materials examined will be wide-ranging, including essays, philosophy, novels, science fiction, television, film. No special background is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (01)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Mergenthaler 431
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (02)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard, Patton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (03)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura (Laura), Patton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111 Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This is the gateway class to the study of African American life, culture, politics and history in the United States and the Caribbean. African American Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study that includes history, social sciences, literature and the arts. This academic discipline is often taught under parallel terms emphasizing related geographies and identifying concepts: Black Studies, Afro-American Studies, Africana Studies, Pan-African Studies and African Diaspora Studies. Unlike every other modern academic discipline in the college, African American Studies was founded because of a social and political revolution. The class has two purposes, operating in tandem: (1) provide students with a generous historical, political and cultural overview of the lives of African descendants in the western hemisphere, but principally in North America; (2) explicitly address the problem of regularized systemic inequality in American society as a response to and an attempt to dominate a core nugget of identity difference that is the operative mechanism in black protest, resistance and revolt. This is a difference that includes, but is not limited by or reducible to morphology, culture, history, and ontology. We accept as an operating principle that an inquiry into an enslaved group of nonwestern human beings marked by difference cannot rely solely on the western episteme for its excavation. Thus, we will examine a body of diverse evidence during the semester, works of literature, history, sociology, political science, music and film. The course requirements include essays, examinations, and presentations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room: Hackerman 320  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

African American Poetry and Poetics
AS.362.201 (01)

In this course, we will follow the development of black poetry primarily as it has evolved in the United States. Beginning with the first published African American writers of the eighteenth century and ending with several important poets writing and performing today, we will consider the shape of the African American poetic tradition as commonly anthologized and as defined by our own theoretically-informed readings of the assigned literature. Attention will be given to both canonical and neglected literary movements and groups. Readings will include poetry and essays by Frances E.W. Harper, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Harryette Mullen, Tracie Morris, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room: Maryland 201  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Creating the Jazz Image
AS.300.318 (01)

What is jazz? What do we think of when we hear the term “jazz culture”? Where does it stand and how does it function in American culture and social history? In this course, we will look at ways in which jazz and one of its fundamental elements, improvisation, influence and is influenced by other forms of art. We will look at both at the history of the music and its relation to painting, design, photography, poetry, fiction, dance and film, as well as its impact on forming identities, social structures and political questions. We will discuss the role of jazz within the wider frameworks of race, gender, ethnicity, class, and nationality, as well as its status as an entertainment and art form up until late-60s.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Ince, Ezgi
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.100 (01)FYS: What is the Common Good?T 1:30PM - 3:30PMWatters, AlizaGilman 217
 
AS.060.100 (01)Introduction to Expository WritingMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMO'Connor, Marie T (Marisa)Gilman 10
 
AS.060.100 (02)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBrodsky, Anne-Elizabeth MurdyGilman 277
 
AS.060.100 (03)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBrodsky, Anne-Elizabeth MurdyGilman 308
 
AS.060.100 (07)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKoullas, Sandy GillianGilman 313
 
AS.060.100 (08)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKoullas, Sandy GillianGilman 10
 
AS.060.113 (01)Expository Writing: Emotion(s)MWF 9:00AM - 9:50AMAsuni, MicheleGilman 217
 
AS.060.113 (02)Expository Writing: Repairing the “Highway to Nowhere”MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMSpeller, Morris Elsmere Longley (Mo)Bloomberg 168
 
AS.060.113 (03)Expository Writing: Policing the PoliceMW 8:30AM - 9:45AMCarter, BryanGilman 119
 
AS.060.113 (04)Expository Writing: Shakespeare’s Richard III and DisabilityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBest, Royce LeeKrieger 170
 
AS.060.113 (05)Expository Writing: Vaccines, Science, and ValuesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMWilbanks, RebeccaShaffer 300
 
AS.060.113 (06)Expository Writing: Politics and ViolenceMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMOppel, GeorgeMaryland 309
 
AS.060.113 (07)Expository Writing: Politics and ViolenceMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMOppel, GeorgeGilman 217
 
AS.060.113 (08)Expository Writing: Who Writes History?MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMWaller, Jill SGilman 277
 
AS.060.113 (09)Expository Writing: The “Dark Side” of ProgressTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMRoss, Sarah CatherineBloomberg 278
 
AS.060.113 (10)Expository Writing: Shakespeare’s Richard III and DisabilityMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMBest, Royce LeeGilman 217
 
AS.060.113 (11)Expository Writing: Witchcraft and PowerTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMCutler, Sylvia (Sylvia)Latrobe 120
 
AS.060.113 (12)Expository Writing: Who Owns the Past?TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMEssam, Richard James LlewellynBLC 5015
 
AS.060.113 (13)Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of WorkTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBegg, Aaron JaredGilman 288
 
AS.060.113 (14)Expository Writing: The “Dark Side” of ProgressTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRoss, Sarah CatherineGilman 377
 
AS.060.113 (15)Expository Writing: Structural InjusticeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMasin-Peters, Jonathan (Jon)Smokler Center 213
 
AS.060.113 (16)Expository Writing: Swamp ThingsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMDubay, Noelle VictoriaGilman 400
 
AS.060.113 (17)Expository Writing: Contemporary American Short StoriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBerger, Donald WGilman 277
 
AS.060.113 (18)Expository Writing: Science Fiction and Climate CatastropheTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMShipko, David Thomas, Jr.Hodson 315
 
AS.060.113 (19)Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of WorkTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBegg, Aaron JaredMaryland 217
 
AS.060.113 (20)Expository Writing: Euthanasia and Cultural Conceptions of a “Good Death”TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMChase, Mikaela Ondine (Miki)Maryland 202
 
AS.060.113 (21)Expository Writing: Swamp ThingsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDubay, Noelle VictoriaJenkins 102
 
AS.060.113 (22)Expository Writing: What Do We Owe to Animals?TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMPowell, Kevin Matthew (Kevin)Gilman 377
 
AS.060.113 (23)Expository Writing: No Justice No Peace?TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKirmizidag, NurGilman 134
 
AS.060.113 (24)Expository Writing: A Right of Self-Defense?MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMLester, Quinn A (Quinn)Gilman 277
 
AS.060.113 (25)Expository Writing: Stories from the American SouthTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMMurphy, Jamison FGilman 130D
 
AS.060.113 (26)Expository Writing:Repairing the “Highway to Nowhere”MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMSpeller, Morris Elsmere Longley (Mo)MSE Library Eisenberg
 
AS.060.157 (01)Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and BeyondTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLoker, Evan (Evan)Latrobe 120
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.060.166 (01)Crafting Race in 19th Century British CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMakonnen, Atesede Retta (Sede)Gilman 130D
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.060.167 (01)A Room of One's Own: Modernism and PrivacyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStreim, Alexander MichaelKrieger Laverty
 
MSCH-HUM
AS.060.168 (01)Visions of the Home: Communes and Collective Living in American CultureT 4:00PM - 6:30PMGiardini, Joseph Aurelio (Jo)Maryland 309
 
AS.060.207 (01)William ShakespeareF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AMDaniel, AndrewGilman 132
Gilman 186
ENGL-LEC
AS.060.207 (02)William ShakespeareF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AMDaniel, AndrewGilman 132
Maryland 217
ENGL-LEC
AS.060.217 (01)Time TravelMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRosenthal, Jesse KarlHodson 311
Krieger 304
ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.217 (02)Time TravelMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRosenthal, Jesse KarlHodson 311
Krieger 300
ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.221 (01)The Modernist Novel: Consciousness and CrisisMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMao, DouglasAmes 218
Krieger Laverty
ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.221 (02)The Modernist Novel: Consciousness and CrisisMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMao, DouglasAmes 218
MSE Library Eisenberg
ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.313 (01)Literature of the Settler RevolutionW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHickman, Jared WGilman 288
 
ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.060.341 (01)MiltonTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAchinstein, SharonMaryland 309
 
ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.354 (01)Literature of the SeaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNurhussein, NadiaCroft Hall B32
 
ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.060.362 (01)Medicine in Renaissance LiteratureF 1:30PM - 4:00PMDaniel, AndrewGilman 400
 
ENGL-PR1800, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.368 (01)Early/Modern/CucksT 4:15PM - 6:45PMLewis, Alexander (Alex)Maryland 114
 
AS.211.362 (01)Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, QueerTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMNitis, MayaGilman 130G
 
INST-PT
AS.211.477 (01)Renaissance Witches and DemonologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStephens, Walter E 
 
AS.213.407 (01)German Media TheoryM 1:30PM - 4:00PMPfannkuchen, AntjeGilman 418
 
INST-CP
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSiraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
 
AS.360.133 (01)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMPatton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)Mergenthaler 111
Mergenthaler 431
AS.360.133 (02)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMBett, Richard, Patton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)Mergenthaler 111
Mergenthaler 111
AS.360.133 (03)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsT 10:30AM - 11:45AM, Th 10:30AM - 11:45AMDi Bianco, Laura (Laura), Patton, Elizabeth (Elizabeth)Mergenthaler 111
Gilman 208
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMJackson, Lawrence PHackerman 320
 
AS.362.201 (01)African American Poetry and PoeticsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNurhussein, NadiaMaryland 201
 
AS.300.318 (01)Creating the Jazz ImageTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMInce, EzgiGilman 208