Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

*Please note the modalities listed for each course. Below is a description of course modalities:

Teaching Class In-Person with Students Attending Remotely or In-Person.
Faculty using this modality would teach in a tech-enhanced classroom on the Homewood campus. Students may attend in person or remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Teaching Class Remotely with Students Attending Remotely or In-Person.
Faculty using this modality would teach a course by streaming into the classroom from a remote location, which could include a dedicated studio, a modified classroom, or an office. A teaching assistant or technology assistant might be in the classroom to manage the technology and to facilitate student engagement. Students may attend in person or remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Hybrid Course (50% In-Person and 50% Online).
Faculty using this modality would teach a course by alternating the meeting pattern between in-person and online. This could be done by teaching class in-person for week 1, online for week 2, in-person for week 3, etc. Such an option reduces in-person contact hours and increases opportunities for different instructors to use the same instructional space. Students must also have the option to attend in-person sessions remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Online-Synchronous Components.
Faculty using this modality will teach students remotely. Faculty will incorporate asynchronous components to the course, but the class would still have a day/time for
synchronous zoom meetings. Any synchronous components will need an alternative for students to participate asynchronously due to time zone differences, etc.
Online-100% Asynchronous.
Faculty using this modality will pre-record instructional content for asynchronous delivery. Courses will be designed intentionally so that course content, student engagement, and assessment would all occur without the need to hold zoom sessions during a regular day and time.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Antigone's Echoes: Activism and the Law from Ancient Greece to Today
AS.040.214 (01)

Where should the law come from, the individual or the state? What does it mean to apply a law equitably? How can one protest an unjust system? These are just a few questions that Antigone, long considered to be one of the most important dramatic works in the western tradition, has raised for philosophers and playwrights across the centuries. In this class we will read several versions of Sophocles’ Antigone and explore this character’s enduring relevance to theories of gender, performance, world literature, and politics. Dean's Teaching Fellowship course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Warwick, Ryan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (01)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: O'Connor, Marie T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (02)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: O'Connor, Marie T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (04)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Brodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (05)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Brodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literary Study
AS.060.107 (01)

This course serves as an introduction to the basic methods of and critical approaches to the study of literature. Some sections may have further individual topic descriptions; please check in SIS when searching for courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Robots, Androids, Slaves
AS.060.109 (01)

Since the rise of Silicon Valley, tech enthusiasts and futurists have been debating the possibility of what has been called “the singularity” — the moment when artificial intelligence (AI) decisively and irreversibly surpasses human abilities. If this does happen, observers worry, it’s not just that robots will take our jobs; will we become subservient to our new robot masters? Will we become extinct, and not because of climate change? This course explores such questions through the lens of literature and popular media. We will watch several films from the last 15 years or so that depict the rise of AI. We will ask about the roles tat gender, race and class have in our imagination of the work robots do. And we will read a range of short essays that approach the question of labor and technology from different angles than mass media usually do.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Nealon, Christopher
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:Alter Egos in Film
AS.060.114 (01)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Oliver, Xavier A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Who Owns the Past?
AS.060.114 (02)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Essam, Richard James Llewellyn
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:Moral Relativism and Beyond
AS.060.114 (03)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Korzukhin, Theodore M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Moral Relativism and Beyond
AS.060.114 (04)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Korzukhin, Theodore M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Personal Identity and Survival
AS.060.114 (05)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Brophy, Kathryn E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Politics and Violence
AS.060.114 (06)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Oppel, George
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Vaccines, Science, and Values
AS.060.114 (07)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Wilbanks, Rebecca
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Politics and Violence
AS.060.114 (08)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Oppel, George
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Nature, Culture, and Climate Change
AS.060.114 (09)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Doherty, Nathanael Joseph
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:The Politics of Pop
AS.060.114 (10)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Huttner, Tobias Reed
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Private Eyes and Police Detectives
AS.060.114 (11)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Franchi, Sophia A
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Cross-Cultural Encounters in the Middle Ages
AS.060.114 (12)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Daniels, Nathan Adam
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:Getting Married
AS.060.114 (13)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Dubay, Noelle Victoria
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Structural Injustice
AS.060.114 (14)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Masin-Peters, Jonathan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Exploring the Philosophy of Love
AS.060.114 (15)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Koullas, Sandy Gillian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Contemporary American Short Stories
AS.060.114 (16)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Berger, Donald W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of Work
AS.060.114 (17)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Begg, Aaron Jared
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Emotion(s)
AS.060.114 (18)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Asuni, Michele
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: No Justice No Peace?
AS.060.114 (19)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kirmizidag, Nur
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Research Methods
AS.060.182 (01)

What counts as “research” in English literary studies? Where do you start? How is English studies research different from other fields including composition/rhetoric, history, or creative writing? This course is designed to help students learn to answer these questions, by familiarizing you will the basics of English studies research. We start by learning about the major methods and strategies available to ask generative research questions. Then, we dive into the resources available (and the skills that best access these resources) to see what answers are possible when conducting an inquiry for a literary studies project. Assignments will focus on identifying major starting places and helping you develop your writing and critical thinking.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Ross, Sarah Catherine
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Shakespeare the Novel
AS.060.207 (01)

What if, instead of being murdered, Desdemona had committed suicide by proxy? What if King Lear was a present-day Indian business mogul and Cordelia an eco-warrior? Or a South African literature professor? What if we thought about Othello through the lens of migrancy and post-colonialism; or the holocaust? What if the "shrew" Kate lived in Baltimore today--what would "taming" look like? When novelists rewrite Shakespeare, they pose questions left hanging in the plays and bring the plays into our own worlds. In this course, we will read Shakespeare plays (King Lear, Taming of the Shrew, Othello) along with 20th century novels that rewrite – and confront -- those plays (by Phillips, Coetzee, Tyler, Taneja, Salih). Students will take up important literary questions about kinds or genres of literature (plays vs novels), the canon, imitation, adaptation, and also address the themes of power, gender and sexuality, dynastic succession, authority, empire, colonization and climate. Three short papers, midterm, weekly homework posts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800

Shakespeare the Novel
AS.060.207 (02)

What if, instead of being murdered, Desdemona had committed suicide by proxy? What if King Lear was a present-day Indian business mogul and Cordelia an eco-warrior? Or a South African literature professor? What if we thought about Othello through the lens of migrancy and post-colonialism; or the holocaust? What if the "shrew" Kate lived in Baltimore today--what would "taming" look like? When novelists rewrite Shakespeare, they pose questions left hanging in the plays and bring the plays into our own worlds. In this course, we will read Shakespeare plays (King Lear, Taming of the Shrew, Othello) along with 20th century novels that rewrite – and confront -- those plays (by Phillips, Coetzee, Tyler, Taneja, Salih). Students will take up important literary questions about kinds or genres of literature (plays vs novels), the canon, imitation, adaptation, and also address the themes of power, gender and sexuality, dynastic succession, authority, empire, colonization and climate. Three short papers, midterm, weekly homework posts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800

American Literature, 1865 to today
AS.060.222 (01)

This course is a survey of major developments in American poetry and narrative fiction from the end of the Civil War to the present day. Authors to be covered may include Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Henry James, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Wallace Stevens, and John Ashbery.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

American Literature, 1865 to today
AS.060.222 (02)

This course is a survey of major developments in American poetry and narrative fiction from the end of the Civil War to the present day. Authors to be covered may include Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Henry James, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Wallace Stevens, and John Ashbery.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Literature of Incarceration
AS.060.315 (01)

We will take up a history of writing from and about various carceral sites (prison, detention camps, etc-- as well as Circe’ island and Jonah’s whale) to see what they can teach us about larger questions of the movement (or not) of certain populations, the ideology and economies of imprisonment, and campaigns for the abolition of prisons.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Favret, Mary
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/13
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Visions of the Home: Communes and Collective Living in American Literature
AS.060.322 (01)

In this course, we will examine stories of intentional and communal living, attending to the ways in which narratives of home life have been shaped by larger social and historical structures. We will read autobiographical narratives, collectively written guides to structure and etiquette, satirical novels, and science fiction in order to query what the possibilities and limits of the home are envisioned to be. We will consider, among other issues: gendered labor and queer kinship; the shifting economics of housing, real estate, and rent; the formation of neighbourhoods and local identities; questions of movement, immigration, citizenship, and race; the dynamics of interpersonal conflict in intimate spaces; and how questions of familial belonging and kinship affect one’s sense of home.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Giardini, Joseph Aurelio
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Beyond Shakespeare
AS.060.332 (01)

What was early modern drama and who was it for? How did it register, and, occasionally, transform and influence the political, religious, racial, sexual and economic frameworks and institutional realities that surrounded the playhouses? This course draws upon fresh scholarship in dramatic history and criticism to widen the conversation about early modern drama beyond the frame of Shakespeare’s development and influence. We will read newly edited plays by Thomas Preston, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Dekker, Thomas Middleton, George Chapman, Philip Massinger, John Webster, John Fletcher, Elizabeth Cary and multiple anonymous authors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Literature in the Age of Revolution, 1780-1830
AS.060.338 (01)

This course explores literary, philosophical, and political writing from the years 1780 to 1830. It asks students to consider what constitutes a “revolution”; and how transformations in political, economic, and social organization across the Atlantic world (and beyond) are experienced, in their own time and in ours.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Childers, Joel Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

A Room of One's Own: Modernism and Privacy
AS.060.339 (01)

Modernism is often understood as having discovered new ways of rendering private, psychological life. Writers such as James Joyce and Virginia Woolf, for instance, wrote prose that gave its readers the feeling of being inside someone’s head. But these forays into new psychological interiors were composed within particular architectural arrangements, and described particular kinds of rooms. In this course, we will consider how access to or a lack of privacy – in Woolf’s phrase, “a room of one’s own” – shapes modernist literature. As the semester continues, we will see the resonances of “privacy” expand beyond its physical meaning to include emotional, identitarian, and cultural privacies. Novelists include Woolf, CLR James, Nella Larsen, and Willa Cather; poets include Gertrude Stein, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Streim, Alexander Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reason and Romance: Literature of the British Eighteenth Century
AS.060.350 (01)

Any era can be characterized by its oppositions and polarities, but perhaps few were more defined by their contradictions than the eighteenth century in Britain. Reason and passion, honor and ribaldry, skepticism and fantasy, tradition and revolution: in capturing the tensions between these dyads, the wildly energetic literature of the period furnishes a singular lens through which to examine questions of consciousness, gender, celebrity, race, political theater, and even life during a pandemic that continue to shape our lives today. Authors studied may include Frances Burney, Ottobah Cugoano, Daniel Defoe, Olaudah Equiano, John Gay, Samuel Johnson, Charlotte Lennox, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, and Mary Wollstonecraft.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Margaret Atwood: Imagining Catastrophe
AS.060.353 (01)

This is the moment for a course on the Canadian climate activist, poet, and novelist Margaret Atwood. Best known for her dystopian The Handmaid's Tale (1985), Atwood's monitory visions in poetry, short stories, non-fiction and novels attend to themes of malevolence, metamorphosis, memory, genetic mutation, totalitarianism, corporate control, feminism, and climate disaster, while rooted in traditions of folktale, myth, and ironic detachment. Among other works, including poetry and non-fiction, we will read novels The Handmaid's Tale, The Testaments, The Blind Assassin, Oryx and Crake, The Year of the Flood, and MaddAddam, exploring Atwood's "writing with intent." Seminar discussion; midterm; class presentations; two short papers and one final project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Crafting Race in 19th Century British Culture
AS.060.357 (01)

Race is a social construct – but how does society actually create that construct? “Crafting Race in 19th Century British Culture” explores how the idea of race was developed, deployed, and reinforced through 19th century British cultural objects. Students investigate how media like literature and art produce and replicate arguments about race that justified or fought against oppression, from the poetry of the abolition movement to Jane Eyre’s relationship with racialized bodies to The Moonstone’s concerns with imperialism. Alongside literary texts, students will also work with advertisements, paintings, and theatrical practice. We take an intersectional approach, thinking not only about race, but also the connections between gender, class, sexuality, and disability. What are the roots of problems we think of as exclusively modern, like whitewashing in media? How has racial thinking been passed down through time and across oceans? Ultimately, our investigation aims to provide insight to modern issues of race through a better understanding of social history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Makonnen, Atesede Retta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

The Politics of Memoir
AS.060.361 (01)

This course explores the interlocking political and historical dimensions of personal experience, an account of ourselves and our relations (“the quest for competitive advantage between groups, individuals, or societies”) that points us in the direction of what “is ‘common’ to the whole community.” What does it mean for people who are not the chief actors or theoreticians of political movements to construe the record of their experience as an act of political intervention, an aid in our total understanding of the structure of popular belief and behavior? Furthermore, what happens when attempt to historicize and critique these recorded experiences? The class asks its members to focus closely on an episode of autobiographical experience as both an historical fossil and tangible politicized moment, particularly the places where race, gender and economic power are visible. By producing a “critical discourse of everyday life—by turning residual, untheorized everyday experience into communicable experience… one can reframe ostensibly private and individual experiences in terms of a collective struggle.” To help our investigation we will read and analyze closely memoirs, many of them from the African American experience. We function partly as a writers’ workshop and partly as a critical review. The final goal of the seminar is a polished 20-25 page autobiographical essay.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Passing in American Culture
AS.100.275 (01)

This course explores passing narratives – stories that feature people who cross race, class, ethnic, or gender boundaries. We will consider what passing narratives can teach us about power and identity, especially as power is presumed to reside in the self and race is presumed to no longer matter.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

This is Not Propaganda
AS.196.364 (01)

We live in an era of disinformation’ mass persuasion and media manipulation run amok. More information was meant to improve democracy and undermine authoritarian regimes- instead the opposite seems to be happening. This course will take you from Russia to South Asia, Europe to the US, to analyze how our information environment has been transformed, why our old formulae for resisting manipulation are failing, and what needs to be done to create a model where deliberative democracy can flourish.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Pomeranzev, Peter
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, INST-IR

Uncanny Valleys in Literature & Film
AS.211.335 (01)

When artificial humans too closely resemble actual human beings, feelings of eeriness or revulsion can be elicited in human observers - the ‘uncanny valley’ effect. Something to be avoided in robotics, in fiction this effect has been a source of endless fascination. Tales of the supernatural, science fiction and horror often use doubt about the human or non-human status of fictional characters to structure imaginary worlds. What can our engagement with artificial humans in fiction tell us about our own humanity? How can emotional entanglement with not-quite-human characters help us critically reflect on aspects of reality? Class will be discussion-based with accompanying readings from literary theory, philosophy, sociology and other fields addressing relevant themes. Authors may include ETA Hoffmann, Nietzsche, Freud, Wittgenstein, Kafka and Philip K. Dick. Films may include Blade Runner and Get Out.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Grousdanidou, Antonia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Knowledge in Literary and Theoretical Perspectives
AS.211.362 (01)

How does what we learn and what we call knowledge matter? Is it clear what “knowledge” means? Does it have the same meaning historically, across different academic disciplines and in daily life? Never have such questions been more relevant than in these volatile times. This course offers a literary and theoretical inquiry into the matter of knowledge/s. Through works by authors from diverse, interdisciplinary traditions including German and American thought and literature, as well as critical, Black, feminist, and queer theory, we will address alternative epistemologies that operate with “partial” or “unfinished” models of knowledge. Thus, students will become familiar with difficult, influential material from various disciplines, while focusing less on judgment and more on dialogical aspects of knowing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Nitis, Maya
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL

Dante's Journey through the Afterlife
AS.211.479 (01)

Dante's Divine Comedy presents a complete picture of the medieval world-view in all its aspects: physical (the structure of the cosmos), historical (the major actors from Adam to Dante himself) and moral (a complete system of right and wrong). Dante shows how the Christian religion portrayed itself, other religions, the nature of God, humans, angels and devils, and human society. We will explore these topics both from the viewpoint of Dante's own time, and in terms of its relevance to our own societal and cultural concerns.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dante's Journey through the Afterlife
AS.211.479 (02)

Dante's Divine Comedy presents a complete picture of the medieval world-view in all its aspects: physical (the structure of the cosmos), historical (the major actors from Adam to Dante himself) and moral (a complete system of right and wrong). Dante shows how the Christian religion portrayed itself, other religions, the nature of God, humans, angels and devils, and human society. We will explore these topics both from the viewpoint of Dante's own time, and in terms of its relevance to our own societal and cultural concerns.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

21st Century Female Playwrights
AS.225.318 (01)

This is a writing intensive class exploring the current wealth of women playwrights, including Pulitzer Prize winners: Wendy Wasserstein, Paula Vogel, Lynn Nottage, and Jackie Sibblies Drury (2019 Prize for FAIRVIEW). We will discuss Script Analysis and read (and see) plays by numerous writers including Claire Barron, Kia Corthron, Theresa Rebeck, Sarah Ruhl, Danai Gurira, Caleen Sinnette Jennings, and Hansol Jung. This class will include a mid-term and a Final Paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Denithorne, Margaret
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Creating the Jazz Image
AS.300.318 (01)

What is jazz? What do we think of when we hear the term “jazz culture”? Where does it stand and how does it function in American culture and social history? In this course, we will look at ways in which jazz and one of its fundamental elements, improvisation, influence and is influenced by other forms of art. We will look at both at the history of the music and its relation to painting, design, photography, poetry, fiction, dance and film, as well as its impact on forming identities, social structures and political questions. We will discuss the role of jazz within the wider frameworks of race, gender, ethnicity, class, and nationality, as well as its status as an entertainment and art form up until late-60s.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ince, Ezgi
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literature and Film of Unintended Consequences
AS.300.340 (01)

Sometimes brilliant ideas and plans don’t work as anticipated, or go very badly—for example, empowering the “invisible hand” of the market, building a huge hydroelectric dam, or plotting a double murder by two strangers. This course explores these and other fascinating literary instances of unintended consequences—the unanticipated results of actions that people planned ending up a very different way. Reading or watching mainly twentieth-century American literature and movies, as well as some essays and poetry, we will follow a range of different creators as they think about unplanned effects and why they matter. What can these works tell us about how we intend, act, or make meaning at the limits of our control? Texts will include films by Charlie Chaplin, Billy Wilder, and Alfred Hitchcock, poetry or fiction by Wallace Stevens, Patricia Highsmith, and Zadie Smith.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Modernist Novel: James, Woolf, and Joyce
AS.300.418 (01)

In this course, we will survey the major works of three of the greatest, most relentless innovators of the twentieth century – Henry James, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce – who explored and exploded narrative techniques for depicting what Woolf called the “luminous halo” of life.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ong, Yi-Ping
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to African American Studies
AS.362.111 (01)

This is the gateway class to the study of African American life, culture, politics and history in the United States and the Caribbean. African American Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study that includes history, social sciences, literature and the arts. This academic discipline is often taught under parallel terms emphasizing related geographies and identifying concepts: Black Studies, Afro-American Studies, Africana Studies, Pan-African Studies and African Diaspora Studies. Unlike every other modern academic discipline in the college, African American Studies was founded because of a social and political revolution. The class has two purposes, operating in tandem: (1) provide students with a generous historical, political and cultural overview of the lives of African descendants in the western hemisphere, but principally in North America; (2) explicitly address the problem of regularized systemic inequality in American society as a response to and an attempt to dominate a core nugget of identity difference that is the operative mechanism in black protest, resistance and revolt. This is a difference that includes, but is not limited by or reducible to morphology, culture, history, and ontology. We accept as an operating principle that an inquiry into an enslaved group of nonwestern human beings marked by difference cannot rely solely on the western episteme for its excavation. Thus, we will examine a body of diverse evidence during the semester, works of literature, history, sociology, political science, music and film. The course requirements include essays, examinations, and presentations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Lawrence P
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.040.214 (01)Antigone's Echoes: Activism and the Law from Ancient Greece to TodayMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMWarwick, Ryan 
AS.060.100 (01)Introduction to Expository WritingMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMO'Connor, Marie T 
AS.060.100 (02)Introduction to Expository WritingMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMO'Connor, Marie T 
AS.060.100 (04)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBrodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy 
AS.060.100 (05)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBrodsky, Anne-Elizabeth Murdy 
AS.060.107 (01)Introduction to Literary StudyTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMJackson, Jeanne-Marie 
AS.060.109 (01)Robots, Androids, SlavesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMNealon, Christopher 
AS.060.114 (01)Expository Writing:Alter Egos in FilmMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMOliver, Xavier A 
AS.060.114 (02)Expository Writing: Who Owns the Past?MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMEssam, Richard James Llewellyn 
AS.060.114 (03)Expository Writing:Moral Relativism and BeyondMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKorzukhin, Theodore M 
AS.060.114 (04)Expository Writing: Moral Relativism and BeyondMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKorzukhin, Theodore M 
AS.060.114 (05)Expository Writing: Personal Identity and SurvivalMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBrophy, Kathryn E 
AS.060.114 (06)Expository Writing: Politics and ViolenceMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMOppel, George 
AS.060.114 (07)Expository Writing: Vaccines, Science, and ValuesMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMWilbanks, Rebecca 
AS.060.114 (08)Expository Writing: Politics and ViolenceMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMOppel, George 
AS.060.114 (09)Expository Writing: Nature, Culture, and Climate ChangeMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDoherty, Nathanael Joseph 
AS.060.114 (10)Expository Writing:The Politics of PopMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHuttner, Tobias Reed 
AS.060.114 (11)Expository Writing: Private Eyes and Police DetectivesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMFranchi, Sophia A 
AS.060.114 (12)Expository Writing: Cross-Cultural Encounters in the Middle AgesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDaniels, Nathan Adam 
AS.060.114 (13)Expository Writing:Getting MarriedTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDubay, Noelle Victoria 
AS.060.114 (14)Expository Writing: Structural InjusticeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMasin-Peters, Jonathan 
AS.060.114 (15)Expository Writing: Exploring the Philosophy of LoveTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMKoullas, Sandy Gillian 
AS.060.114 (16)Expository Writing: Contemporary American Short StoriesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBerger, Donald W 
AS.060.114 (17)Expository Writing: Technology and the Future of WorkTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBegg, Aaron Jared 
AS.060.114 (18)Expository Writing: Emotion(s)TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMAsuni, Michele 
AS.060.114 (19)Expository Writing: No Justice No Peace?TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMKirmizidag, Nur 
AS.060.182 (01)Introduction to Research MethodsT 4:00PM - 6:30PMRoss, Sarah Catherine 
AS.060.207 (01)Shakespeare the NovelMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMAchinstein, Sharon ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.207 (02)Shakespeare the NovelMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMAchinstein, Sharon ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.222 (01)American Literature, 1865 to todayTTh 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMNurhussein, Nadia ENGL-LEC
AS.060.222 (02)American Literature, 1865 to todayTTh 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMNurhussein, Nadia ENGL-LEC
AS.060.315 (01)Literature of IncarcerationTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMFavret, Mary 
AS.060.322 (01)Visions of the Home: Communes and Collective Living in American LiteratureT 4:00PM - 6:30PMGiardini, Joseph Aurelio 
AS.060.332 (01)Beyond ShakespeareT 1:30PM - 4:00PMDaniel, Andrew ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.338 (01)Literature in the Age of Revolution, 1780-1830TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMChilders, Joel Michael ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.339 (01)A Room of One's Own: Modernism and PrivacyMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMStreim, Alexander Michael 
AS.060.350 (01)Reason and Romance: Literature of the British Eighteenth CenturyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMao, Douglas ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.353 (01)Margaret Atwood: Imagining CatastropheMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMAchinstein, Sharon 
AS.060.357 (01)Crafting Race in 19th Century British CultureMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMMakonnen, Atesede Retta ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.060.361 (01)The Politics of MemoirTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Lawrence P ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.100.275 (01)Passing in American CultureW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani T HIST-US
AS.196.364 (01)This is Not PropagandaMW 1:30PM - 2:20PMPomeranzev, Peter INST-CP, INST-IR
AS.211.335 (01)Uncanny Valleys in Literature & FilmMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMGrousdanidou, Antonia GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.362 (01)Knowledge in Literary and Theoretical PerspectivesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMNitis, Maya GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.479 (01)Dante's Journey through the AfterlifeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStephens, Walter E 
AS.211.479 (02)Dante's Journey through the AfterlifeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStephens, Walter E 
AS.225.318 (01)21st Century Female PlaywrightsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMDenithorne, Margaret 
AS.300.318 (01)Creating the Jazz ImageTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMInce, Ezgi 
AS.300.340 (01)Literature and Film of Unintended ConsequencesTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMSiraganian, Lisa Michele 
AS.300.418 (01)The Modernist Novel: James, Woolf, and JoyceMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMOng, Yi-Ping 
AS.362.111 (01)Introduction to African American StudiesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Lawrence P ENGL-GLOBAL