Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

*Please note the modalities listed for each course. Below is a description of course modalities:

Teaching Class In-Person with Students Attending Remotely or In-Person.
Faculty using this modality would teach in a tech-enhanced classroom on the Homewood campus. Students may attend in person or remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Teaching Class Remotely with Students Attending Remotely or In-Person.
Faculty using this modality would teach a course by streaming into the classroom from a remote location, which could include a dedicated studio, a modified classroom, or an office. A teaching assistant or technology assistant might be in the classroom to manage the technology and to facilitate student engagement. Students may attend in person or remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Hybrid Course (50% In-Person and 50% Online).
Faculty using this modality would teach a course by alternating the meeting pattern between in-person and online. This could be done by teaching class in-person for week 1, online for week 2, in-person for week 3, etc. Such an option reduces in-person contact hours and increases opportunities for different instructors to use the same instructional space. Students must also have the option to attend in-person sessions remotely. Asynchronous options will be included for those students to participate asynchronously due to differences in time zones, etc.
Online-Synchronous Components.
Faculty using this modality will teach students remotely. Faculty will incorporate asynchronous components to the course, but the class would still have a day/time for
synchronous zoom meetings. Any synchronous components will need an alternative for students to participate asynchronously due to time zone differences, etc.
Online-100% Asynchronous.
Faculty using this modality will pre-record instructional content for asynchronous delivery. Courses will be designed intentionally so that course content, student engagement, and assessment would all occur without the need to hold zoom sessions during a regular day and time.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: What is the Common Good?
AS.001.100 (01)

What is "the common good"? How do individuals consider this idea, this question, and how are societies led, or misled, by its pursuit? Together, we will explore sources from a range of perspectives: What can the story of Noah, for example, teach us about the question of the common good? Or the engineering of Baltimore public transportation, the notion of meritocracy in higher education, access to vaccines, the perniciousness of pandemics, prohibition of nuclear weapons, or data sharing among scientists? Drawing from movies, interviews, and readings (authors include Rachel Carson, James Baldwin, Bong Joon-ho, Spike Lee, Michael Sandel, and more), this course is as much about how we ask and interrogate hard questions as it is about the answers themselves. Engaging deeply with the sources and each other, students will discuss the texts in class, write short responses, and give occasional oral presentations. The course will culminate in a final, collaborative research project that seeks to map the common good and move the conversation forward.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level:
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 3:30PM
  • Instructor: Watters, Aliza
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Classics Research Lab: The John Addington Symonds Project
AS.040.420 (01)

Launched in January 2019, this CRL project investigates the life and work of the Victorian scholar and writer John Addington Symonds (1840–93). Symonds, trained at Oxford in Classics, was the author of one of the first major studies in English of Ancient Greek Sexuality, “A Problem in Greek Ethics,” printed in just ten copies, one of which is held by Johns Hopkins. He also introduced the word “homosexual,” first coined in German, into English print, and his influence on the emerging struggle for gay rights was immense. A major task of JASP is the reconstruction of the contents of his personal library, in part on the basis of rare archival materials and the recently published full text of his secret autobiography. More information at symondsproject.org. Under the supervision of the project’s two directors, Shane Butler (Classics) and Gabrielle Dean (MSEL), participants will learn advanced research methods, generate new knowledge, and disseminate their results. No prerequisites, but potential students should contact either director for permission to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Butler, Michael Shane, Dean, Gabrielle
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 9/9
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (01)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (02)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (03)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (04)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (05)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (06)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (07)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (08)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (09)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the fundamental structure in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literary Study
AS.060.107 (01)

This course serves as an introduction to the basic methods of and critical approaches to the study of literature. Some sections may have further individual topic descriptions; please check in SIS when searching for courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Hickman, Jared W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literary Study
AS.060.107 (02)

This course serves as an introduction to the basic methods of and critical approaches to the study of literature. Some sections may have further individual topic descriptions; please check in SIS when searching for courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Miller, Andrew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (01)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (02)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (03)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (04)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (05)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (06)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (07)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (08)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (09)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (10)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (11)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (12)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (13)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (14)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (15)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (16)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (17)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (18)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (19)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (20)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (21)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (22)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (23)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (24)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.113 (25)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply “The Fundamental Structure of Academic Argument” in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around three major essay assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the following list of individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and Beyond
AS.060.157 (01)

This course provides an introduction to the texts and rhetoric of the movement that abolished slavery in the Caribbean. Among other topics, we examine: how the formerly enslaved represented their experiences of slavery; how abolitionism emerged across the West Indies, Cuba, and Haiti; and the techniques artists used to imagine radical, post-slavery worlds. Authors include: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Esteban Montejo, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, and Aimé Césaire (all texts will be available in English).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Loker, Evan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Crafting Race in 19th Century British Culture
AS.060.166 (01)

Race is a social construct – but how does society actually create that construct? “Crafting Race in 19th-Century British Culture” explores how the idea of race was developed, deployed, and reinforced through nineteenth-century British cultural objects. Students investigate how media like literature and art produce and replicate arguments about race that justified or fought against oppression. Alongside literary texts, students will also work with advertisements, paintings, and theatrical practice. We take an intersectional approach, thinking not only about race, but also the connections between gender, class, sexuality, and disability. What are the roots of problems we think of as exclusively modern, like whitewashing in media? How has racial thinking been passed down through time and across oceans? Ultimately, our investigation aims to provide insight to modern issues of race through a better understanding of social history.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Makonnen, Atesede Retta
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

A Room of One's Own: Modernism and Privacy
AS.060.167 (01)

TBA

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Streim, Alexander Michael
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Visions of the Home: Communes and Collective Living in American Culture
AS.060.168 (01)

In this course, we will examine stories of intentional and communal living, attending to the ways in which narratives of home life have been shaped by larger social and historical structures. We will read autobiographical narratives, collectively written guides to structure and etiquette, satirical novels, and science fiction in order to query what the possibilities and limits of the home are envisioned to be. We will consider, among other issues: gendered labor and queer kinship; the shifting economics of housing, real estate, and rent; the formation of neighbourhoods and local identities; questions of movement, immigration, citizenship, and race; the dynamics of interpersonal conflict in intimate spaces; and how questions of familial belonging and kinship affect one’s sense of home.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Giardini, Joseph Aurelio
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Doctors without Borders: Literature, Medicine, and the Human Condition
AS.060.204 (01)

Doctors play a significant role in shaping literary history as both writers and fictional subjects. From Chekhov to Sherlock Holmes, W. Somerset Maugham to Middlemarch, medical practice is imagined to bestow a privileged understanding of humanity in confrontation with questions of life and death. This course explores how writing about medicine connects long-established themes of mortality, authority, and ways of knowing to timely questions of global migration, cultural contact, and social justice. We will read literary writing by physicians as well as writing that depicts their work in detail, by authors including Nawal El Saadawi, Atul Gawande, Abraham Verghese, Damon Galgut, and Taiye Selasi.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Doctors without Borders: Literature, Medicine, and the Human Condition
AS.060.204 (02)

Doctors play a significant role in shaping literary history as both writers and fictional subjects. From Chekhov to Sherlock Holmes, W. Somerset Maugham to Middlemarch, medical practice is imagined to bestow a privileged understanding of humanity in confrontation with questions of life and death. This course explores how writing about medicine connects long-established themes of mortality, authority, and ways of knowing to timely questions of global migration, cultural contact, and social justice. We will read literary writing by physicians as well as writing that depicts their work in detail, by authors including Nawal El Saadawi, Atul Gawande, Abraham Verghese, Damon Galgut, and Taiye Selasi.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Shakespeare: the Novel
AS.060.207 (01)

Who was William Shakespeare, and what can his poems, histories, comedies and tragedies tell us about our overlap with, and divergences from, the early modern world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Shakespeare: the Novel
AS.060.207 (02)

Who was William Shakespeare, and what can his poems, histories, comedies and tragedies tell us about our overlap with, and divergences from, the early modern world?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Time Travel
AS.060.217 (01)

Why is time travel such a consistent and perplexing theme in literature and film over the last 150 years? Why is modernity so concerned with peeking backwards or forwards? This course will examine the history of time-travel fiction, from its beginning in utopian fiction through its box-office dominance in the 1980s, and into today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM

Time Travel
AS.060.217 (02)

Why is time travel such a consistent and perplexing theme in literature and film over the last 150 years? Why is modernity so concerned with peeking backwards or forwards? This course will examine the history of time-travel fiction, from its beginning in utopian fiction through its box-office dominance in the 1980s, and into today.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Rosenthal, Jesse Karl
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM

The Modernist Novel: Consciousness and Crisis
AS.060.221 (01)

A course on key novels written in Britain or its former colonies between 1900 and 1960. Major attention to the meanings of modernism across the arts as well as innovations in prose fiction.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM

The Modernist Novel: Consciousness and Crisis
AS.060.221 (02)

A course on key novels written in Britain or its former colonies between 1900 and 1960. Major attention to the meanings of modernism across the arts as well as innovations in prose fiction.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Mao, Douglas
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM

Training\Writing\Consulting
AS.060.307 (01)

A one credit course for those undergrads who have been nominated as Writing Center tutors. Permission required.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 5:00PM - 6:50PM
  • Instructor: Tinkle, Robert E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literature of the Settler Revolution
AS.060.313 (01)

The nineteenth century saw the creation of an “Angloworld” as a result of what one historian has called “the settler revolution.” In perhaps the largest mass migration in human history, millions of English-speakers (and others) invaded Indigenous worlds in what have consequently come to be known as the United States, Canada, and Australia. This seminar offers an introduction to nineteenth-century Indigenous and settler Anglophone writing in the US, Canada, and Australia with a view to understanding the role of literature in inciting, interrogating, and resisting this settler revolution.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hickman, Jared W
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Milton
AS.060.341 (01)

This class will study Milton’s poetry and prose across the whole of his writing career, with special attention to Paradise Lost, the great epic poem retelling the story of the fall of humankind. We will consider Milton’s literary background, his contemporary political and social milieu, as well as critical debates that surrounding the poet, who was accused of being ‘of the devil’s party.’ Pre-1800 course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Literature of the Sea
AS.060.354 (01)

In this course, we will read 19th- and 20th-century American and British literature about the sea, using an approach informed by recent scholarship in what has been called Blue Humanities or Oceanic Studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-GLOBAL

Medicine in Renassaince Literature
AS.060.362 (01)

From quacks to plague, from humoralism to hypochondria, this course explores how early modern literature represents and occasionally satirizes medicine. Authors include Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Nashe, Browne and Moliere.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Daniel, Andrew
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800, MSCH-HUM

Contemporary Russian Novel in English
AS.060.383 (01)

Russia is back in the headlines, and its resurgence seems unlikely to waver anytime soon. But while many students are familiar with nineteenth-century novelists like Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, more recent Russian writing is often a mystery. This course approaches contemporary Russia through the careers of its two major living novelists, Vladimir Sorokin and Ludmila Ulitskaya, both of whose work spans the late Soviet period (1980s and 90s) through today. In addition to questions of genre, translation, and contemporary Russian literary culture’s relation to Soviet models, we will consider how Sorokin and Ulitskaya have brokered Russia’s intellectual standing on a world stage. Works studied will include Ulitskaya’s Sonechka, The Funeral Party, and Daniel Stein, Interpreter, and Sorokin’s The Queue, Day of the Oprichnik, and The Blizzard.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Jackson, Jeanne-Marie
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Crossing the Literary Color Line
AS.100.266 (01)

This course will focus on African American writers who wrote white-life novels. We will examine how writers of the interwar period crossed the literary color line in an attempt to imagine a different kind of reality – one predicated on interracialism and democracy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Mott, Shani T
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): HIST-US

Representing the Holocaust
AS.211.333 (01)

How has the Holocaust been represented in literature and film? Are there special challenges posed by genocide to the traditions of visual and literary representation? Where does the Holocaust fit in to the array of concerns that the visual arts and literature express? And where do art and literature fit in to the commemoration of communal tragedy and the working through of individual trauma entailed by thinking about and representing the Holocaust? These questions will guide our consideration of a range of texts — nonfiction, novels, poetry — in Yiddish, German, English, French and other languages (including works by Primo Levi and Isaac Bashevis Singer), as well as films from French documentaries to Hollywood blockbusters (including films by Alain Resnais, Claude Lanzmann, and Steven Spielberg). All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL

Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, Queer
AS.211.362 (01)

How does what we learn and what we call knowledge matter? Is it clear what “knowledge” means? Does it have the same meaning historically, across different academic disciplines and in daily life? Never have such questions been more relevant than in these volatile times. This course offers a literary and theoretical inquiry into the matter of knowledge/s. Through works by authors from diverse, interdisciplinary traditions including German and American thought and literature, as well as critical, Black, feminist, and queer theory, we will address alternative epistemologies that operate with “partial” or “unfinished” models of knowledge. Thus, students will become familiar with difficult, influential material from various disciplines, while focusing less on judgment and more on dialogical aspects of knowing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Nitis, Maya
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Renaissance Witches and Demonology
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in medicine, theology, literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 49/50
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Media Theory
AS.213.407 (01)

German Media Theory is an advanced course for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, giving an introduction and overview of the specifically German version of Media Studies that first gained traction in the 1980s. The term media refers not just to mass media but more broadly to devices that process, transfer and store information, reaching from the alphabet that changed the culture of writing, or the printing press made famous as the foundation of the ‘Gutenberg galaxy’ to computers and smart phones dominating our current lives. In this course we will cut across disciplinary boundaries to explore the multifaceted roots and formations of German media theory which combine literary poststructuralism, histories of science and technology, psychoanalysis, cybernetics, art history, and philosophy among other fields. Readings include works by Friedrich Kittler, Bernhard Siegert, Cornelia Vismann, Wolfgang Ernst, Walter Benjamin, Niklas Luhmann, Michel Foucault, Marshall McLuhan and many others. The course will be taught in English and all readings will be available in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Forms of Moral Community: The Contemporary World Novel
AS.300.336 (01)

Literary and philosophical imaginations of moral community in the post-WWII period. Texts include: Coetzee, Disgrace; McEwan, Atonement; Achebe,Things Fall Apart; Ishiguro, An Artist of the Floating World; Roy, The God of Small Things; Lessing, The Grass is Singing; Mistry, A Fine Balance; Morrison, Beloved; and essays by Levi, Strawson, Adorno, Murdoch, and Beauvoir on the deep uncertainty over moral community after the crisis of World War II. Close attention to novelistic style and narrative will inform our study of the philosophical questions that animate these works. What does it mean to acknowledge another person’s humanity? Who are the members of a moral community? Why do we hold one another responsible for our actions? How do fundamental moral emotions such as contempt, humiliation, compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, and regret reveal the limits of a moral community?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ong, Yi-Ping
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course explores recent debates on being a person in culture, law, and philosophy. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Materials examined will be wide-ranging, including essays, philosophy, novels, science fiction, television, film. No special background is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literature of the Everyday
AS.300.429 (01)

The ordinary, the common, the everyday: why does literary realism consider the experiences of the average individual to be worthy of serious contemplation? In this course, we will read closely a set of novels by Flaubert, Mann, Dickens, Zola, Tolstoy, and Woolf from the period in which the development of realism reaches it climax. These novels transform the conventions for the representation of lives of lower and middle class subjects, revealing such lives as capable of prompting reflection upon deep and serious questions of human existence.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ong, Yi-Ping
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (01)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (02)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bett, Richard, Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins
AS.360.133 (03)

Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2020 include Homer, Plato, Dante, John Donne, George Herbert, Christina Rosetti, Mary Shelley, Friederick Nietzsche, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Frederick Douglass.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Di Bianco, Laura, Patton, Elizabeth
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

African American Poetry and Poetics
AS.362.201 (01)

In this course, we will follow the development of black poetry primarily as it has evolved in the United States. Beginning with the first published African American writers of the eighteenth century and ending with several important poets writing and performing today, we will consider the shape of the African American poetic tradition as commonly anthologized and as defined by our own theoretically-informed readings of the assigned literature. Attention will be given to both canonical and neglected literary movements and groups. Readings will include poetry and essays by Frances E.W. Harper, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Harryette Mullen, Tracie Morris, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Nurhussein, Nadia
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.100 (01)FYS: What is the Common Good?T 1:30PM - 3:30PMWatters, Aliza 
AS.040.420 (01)Classics Research Lab: The John Addington Symonds ProjectTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMButler, Michael Shane, Dean, Gabrielle 
AS.060.100 (01)Introduction to Expository WritingMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.100 (02)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaff 
AS.060.100 (03)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaff 
AS.060.100 (04)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaff 
AS.060.100 (05)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaff 
AS.060.100 (06)Introduction to Expository WritingMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.100 (07)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.100 (08)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.100 (09)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.107 (01)Introduction to Literary StudyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMHickman, Jared W 
AS.060.107 (02)Introduction to Literary StudyWF 12:00PM - 1:15PMMiller, Andrew 
AS.060.113 (01)Expository Writing:MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaff 
AS.060.113 (02)Expository Writing:MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaff 
AS.060.113 (03)Expository Writing:MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaff 
AS.060.113 (04)Expository Writing:MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (05)Expository Writing:MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (06)Expository Writing:MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (07)Expository Writing:MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (08)Expository Writing:MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (09)Expository Writing:MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (10)Expository Writing:MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (11)Expository Writing:TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaff 
AS.060.113 (12)Expository Writing:TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMStaff 
AS.060.113 (13)Expository Writing:TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaff 
AS.060.113 (14)Expository Writing:TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaff 
AS.060.113 (15)Expository Writing:TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStaff 
AS.060.113 (16)Expository Writing:TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (17)Expository Writing:TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (18)Expository Writing:TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (19)Expository Writing:TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (20)Expository Writing:TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (21)Expository Writing:TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (22)Expository Writing:TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (23)Expository Writing:MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (24)Expository Writing:MW 3:00PM - 4:15PMStaff 
AS.060.113 (25)Expository Writing:TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.060.157 (01)Literature and Anti-slavery in the Caribbean and BeyondTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMLoker, Evan INST-GLOBAL
AS.060.166 (01)Crafting Race in 19th Century British CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMakonnen, Atesede Retta MSCH-HUM
AS.060.167 (01)A Room of One's Own: Modernism and PrivacyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStreim, Alexander Michael MSCH-HUM
AS.060.168 (01)Visions of the Home: Communes and Collective Living in American CultureT 4:00PM - 6:30PMGiardini, Joseph Aurelio 
AS.060.204 (01)Doctors without Borders: Literature, Medicine, and the Human ConditionMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJackson, Jeanne-MarieGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.060.204 (02)Doctors without Borders: Literature, Medicine, and the Human ConditionMW 1:30PM - 2:20PM, F 1:30PM - 2:20PMJackson, Jeanne-MarieGilman 50MSCH-HUM
AS.060.207 (01)Shakespeare: the NovelF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AMDaniel, AndrewGilman 50
AS.060.207 (02)Shakespeare: the NovelF 11:00AM - 11:50AM, MW 11:00AM - 11:50AMDaniel, AndrewGilman 50
AS.060.217 (01)Time TravelMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRosenthal, Jesse Karl ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.217 (02)Time TravelMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMRosenthal, Jesse Karl ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.221 (01)The Modernist Novel: Consciousness and CrisisMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMao, Douglas ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.221 (02)The Modernist Novel: Consciousness and CrisisMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMMao, Douglas ENGL-LEC, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.307 (01)Training\Writing\ConsultingW 5:00PM - 6:50PMTinkle, Robert E 
AS.060.313 (01)Literature of the Settler RevolutionW 1:30PM - 4:00PMHickman, Jared W ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.060.341 (01)MiltonTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAchinstein, Sharon ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.354 (01)Literature of the SeaTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNurhussein, Nadia ENGL-GLOBAL
AS.060.362 (01)Medicine in Renassaince LiteratureF 1:30PM - 4:00PMDaniel, Andrew ENGL-PR1800, MSCH-HUM
AS.060.383 (01)Contemporary Russian Novel in EnglishT 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Jeanne-Marie 
AS.100.266 (01)Crossing the Literary Color LineW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMott, Shani T HIST-US
AS.211.333 (01)Representing the HolocaustW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpinner, Samuel Jacob INST-GLOBAL, GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.362 (01)Critical Knowledges: Black, Feminist, QueerTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMNitis, Maya 
AS.211.477 (01)Renaissance Witches and DemonologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStephens, Walter E 
AS.213.407 (01)German Media TheoryT 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaff 
AS.300.336 (01)Forms of Moral Community: The Contemporary World NovelMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMOng, Yi-Ping 
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStaff 
AS.300.429 (01)Literature of the EverydayF 1:30PM - 4:00PMOng, Yi-Ping 
AS.360.133 (01)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPatton, ElizabethMergenthaler 111
AS.360.133 (02)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBett, Richard, Patton, ElizabethMergenthaler 111
AS.360.133 (03)Freshman Seminar: Great Books at HopkinsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDi Bianco, Laura, Patton, ElizabethMergenthaler 111
AS.362.201 (01)African American Poetry and PoeticsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNurhussein, Nadia