Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Classics Research Lab: The Symonds Project
AS.040.420 (01)

This course gives participants a unique opportunity to engage directly in empirical research and its interpretation and dissemination. Topics vary. This semester’s offering is organized around a project to reconstruct digitally the library of the nineteenth-century writer John Addington Symonds, author of one of the first studies of ancient sexuality. No prerequisites, but potential students should contact instructor for permission to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Expository Writing: Medicine, East and West
AS.060.114 (01)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (01)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize the paradigm of academic argument as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the paradigm in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (04)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize the paradigm of academic argument as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the paradigm in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (03)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize the paradigm of academic argument as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the paradigm in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literary Study
AS.060.107 (01)

This course serves as an introduction to the basic methods of and critical approaches to the study of literature.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Literary Study
AS.060.107 (02)

This course serves as an introduction to the basic methods of and critical approaches to the study of literature.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Illness and Social Stigma
AS.060.114 (02)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Expository Writing
AS.060.100 (02)

Introduction to “Expos” is designed to introduce less experienced writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to recognize the paradigm of academic argument as they learn to read and summarize academic essays, and then they apply the paradigm in academic essays of their own. Classes are small, no more than 10 students, and are organized around three major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Intro” course teaches students to avoid plagiarism and document sources correctly. “Intro” courses do not specialize in a particular topic or theme and are available to freshmen only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Science, Subjectivity, and the Problem of Consciousness
AS.060.114 (03)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: American Gothic
AS.060.114 (04)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.114 (25)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: What Is Love?
AS.060.114 (05)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:
AS.060.114 (24)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Why Poetry Matters: Poets Between Lies and Truth in the English and Italian Renaissance
AS.211.351 (01)

Does poetry participate in the quest for truth and knowledge? How does it compare to other such disciplines as history or philosophy? Are poets liars or do they have a deeper gaze on reality than anyone else? To answer these questions, this course studies poetry’s role within the different fields of human learning in the Renaissance. We will focus on the English and Italian tradition, reading texts by John Milton and Torquato Tasso, and explore the classical roots of the debate around poetry (Aristotle, Plato, Horace). We will then examine the relationship between science and literature through the work of Galileo Galilei. We will also study rare and ancient books in our library. The course is taught in English. All readings will be in English, but the original texts will also be available.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

The Computer in Modern Literature
AS.060.402 (01)

How have computers, and human interactions with computers, been represented in twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature? How have attitudes toward computers changed over that time? Now most books are written on computers, and many are read on them as well: what traces of these forms of production and consumption can we find in literary texts?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Propaganda: From Blut und Boden to Post-Fact
AS.211.203 (01)

This course taught by Writing Seminars professor Wayne Biddle and Media Studies professor Bernadette Wegenstein covers the 20th-century history of propaganda with special focus on its visual techniques, on censorship, and how media serve as sites of both control and resistance to power. We will pay particular attention to the influence of misinformation abetted by the new media revolution, and both the rise of the political rhetoric of “fake news” and the massive dissemination of actual fake news since the 2016 election. Students will write papers pegged to current issues and events using the critical framework developed in class. Cap 30 students. Reader: Jason Stanley: How Propaganda Works, Princeton University Press, 2015.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/30
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Old World/New World Women
AS.060.388 (01)

The course considers the transatlantic writing of three women in the early modern period, Anne Bradstreet, Aphra Behn, and Phillis Wheatley. We will consider issues of identity, spatiality, religion, commerce, enforced labor, sexuality, race, and gender, along with literary tradition, formal analysis and poetics. We will read a good deal of these early women writers. Foremost in our mind will be the question of how perceptions of space and time are mediated through the global experiences of early modernity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-PR1800

Expository Writing: Nature, Culture, and Climate Change
AS.060.114 (12)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Law and Revenge
AS.060.114 (06)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Justice
AS.060.114 (11)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: What Is Love?
AS.060.114 (07)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Law and Revenge
AS.060.114 (08)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Inequality and Urban Design
AS.060.114 (09)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: What Is Mental Illness?
AS.060.114 (10)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Democracy and Lies
AS.060.114 (19)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The Ethics of Tourism
AS.060.114 (16)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Comedy and Crossdressing
AS.060.114 (22)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Age of Collapse?
AS.060.114 (23)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The Dark Side of Progress
AS.060.114 (13)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Cross-Cultural Encounters in the Middle Ages
AS.060.114 (14)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Cli-Fi Climate Change Fiction
AS.060.114 (18)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Black Panther, Race, and Representation
AS.060.114 (17)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Violence and Macbeth
AS.060.114 (21)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Romanticism, the Strange, and the Otherworldly
AS.060.114 (15)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing:Violence and Macbeth
AS.060.114 (20)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: The Narrative Essay
AS.060.139 (01)

Telling stories is one of the first and most important ways that human beings try to make sense of the world and their experience of it. The narrative art informs fiction and nonfiction alike, is central to the writing of history, anthropology, crime reports and laboratory reports, sports stories and political documentaries. What happened? The answer may be imagined or factual, but it will almost certainly be narrative. This course focuses on the narrative essay, a nonfiction prose form that answers the question of “what happened” in a variety of contexts and aims to make sense not only of what happened but how and why. We will begin by summarizing narrative essays, will move to analyzing them, and in the second half of the course you will write two narrative essays of your own, the first based on a choice of topics and sources, the second of your own design. Authors may include James Baldwin, Annie Dillard, Chang Rae Lee, Danielle Ofri, George Orwell, Richard Rodriguez, Richard Selzer, and Abraham Verghese. You will learn the power of narrative to inform and persuade as you test that power in your own writing.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Writing Africa Now
AS.060.129 (01)

This course surveys post-2000 literary and cultural production from sub-Saharan Africa. Topics will include debates over genre and fiction’s relevance to African experience, legacies of canonical writing about independence, urban Africa as violent or “tragic” landscape, and problems of scale and geographical context. Readings by authors such as Adichie, Wainaina, Duiker, and Vladislavic, and students will be introduced to the main print and online arteries of African intellectual discussion. This class is for non-majors and does not count towards the English major or minor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Introduction to the Research Paper - Controversies in Adolescence
AS.060.155 (01)

“Introduction to the Research Paper” is designed to introduce more experienced student writers to the fundamental skills of the research process. These include asking research questions, evaluating the usefulness of sources to answer them, synthesizing sources, reading sources critically, and developing arguments that deliver an original thesis. Students will work with a research librarian at the Eisenhower Library, with whom they will learn to navigate traditional databases as well as new media sources. The Research Paper is topic-based and divided into three linked units of instruction. The course culminates with a paper of 10-12 pages that draws upon the cumulative skills of the semester. Each course is capped at ten students and available only to those who have taken “Expository Writing” (060.113/114)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Shakespeare
AS.060.207 (03)

Reading the major comedies, histories and tragedies alongside the narrative poem “Venus and Adonis” and the sonnets, this survey course considers Shakespeare’s hybrid career as poet and playwright. Pre 1800 course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800

British Literature II
AS.060.210 (02)

This course provides a framework for grasping the dazzling variety and explosive innovation of literature in English during the last quarter-millennium. Attending both to textual details and to historical contexts, we will see how Wordsworth, Austen, Keats, Tennyson, Dickens, Wilde, Woolf, Rushdie, and other writers extend and undo tradition, illuminate their times and places as well as our own, and conspire to bring to us the intense experience distinctive to great literary art.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Shakespeare
AS.060.207 (02)

Reading the major comedies, histories and tragedies alongside the narrative poem “Venus and Adonis” and the sonnets, this survey course considers Shakespeare’s hybrid career as poet and playwright. Pre 1800 course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800

How Not to be Afraid of Poetry
AS.060.211 (02)

What is poetry? And why don't we like it? This course will explore what makes poetry turn ordinary language into something extraordinary. Opening up a range of poetry in English, the course will involve reading poetry aloud, thinking about poetry and its forms, and gaining experience in understanding poetry. Assignments will include attending to details small and large in poems, becoming an expert about a single poet, debating aesthetic issues, and composing short analytical papers about poems. There are two required written assignments, a midterm and a final examination.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

British Literature II
AS.060.210 (03)

This course provides a framework for grasping the dazzling variety and explosive innovation of literature in English during the last quarter-millennium. Attending both to textual details and to historical contexts, we will see how Wordsworth, Austen, Keats, Tennyson, Dickens, Wilde, Woolf, Rushdie, and other writers extend and undo tradition, illuminate their times and places as well as our own, and conspire to bring to us the intense experience distinctive to great literary art.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Mind, Body, and Materialist Science in Victorian Literature
AS.060.323 (01)

What was the relationship between mind and body in Victorian discourses of science? In 1875, William B. Carpenter gave a lecture entitled “Is Man an Automaton?” claiming that the human mind was reducible to material processes that were independent of the higher faculty of the will. Prior to Carpenter, however, nineteenth-century thinkers had already been exploring the possibility of the material foundation of human existence. Was the mind an extension of the body? How could scientific theories explain unknown, hidden domains of the mind? How far could evolutionary science go to challenge the foundation of human existence by locating psychological phenomena in biological life and in physical adaptations to the material environment? To explore these questions, this course examines the discourses of the mind and body in the Victorian era that were shaped by both literary and scientific texts. Starting with the pseudo-scientific discourse of mesmerism, we will examine the growing interest in observing mental life through outward bodily signs. We will then investigate discourses surrounding mental illness, automatic behavior, the unconscious workings of memory, evolutionary and hereditary ideas, and the relationship between human and nonhuman organisms. As we read texts written by Charles Darwin, Herbert Spencer, George Eliot, Wilkie Collins, Thomas Hardy, and Olive Schreiner, we will explore how such scientific discourses challenged traditional notions of dualism, identity, agency, and ethics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Contemporary Novel of Ideas
AS.060.342 (01)

The novel of ideas is often traced to 18th century French or 19th century Russian writing, but it has come broadly to signify works of robust philosophical contemplation. The inherently slippery term seems to indicate a work in which “form” is subsidiary to “content,” or at least, in which narrative structures adapt to prioritize thought rather than style, image, or even character. But how, exactly, and about what, do novels “think?” In large part, the novel of ideas is now conflated with a rote and recognizable brand of social realism. This course asks what might qualify as a novel of ideas today, both in terms of the novel’s changing relation to geographical space (and thereby the formal spaces in which philosophy might lurk), and of the particular “ideas” it critiques or puts forth. We will read novelists including J.M. Coetzee, Marlene van Niekerk, Jonathan Franzen, Teju Cole, and Ronan Bennett within a longer literary-philosophical tradition, with reference to works such as Candide, War and Peace, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, and Kierkegaard’s Diary of a Seducer.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

How Not to be Afraid of Poetry
AS.060.211 (01)

What is poetry? And why don't we like it? This course will explore what makes poetry turn ordinary language into something extraordinary. Opening up a range of poetry in English, the course will involve reading poetry aloud, thinking about poetry and its forms, and gaining experience in understanding poetry. Assignments will include attending to details small and large in poems, becoming an expert about a single poet, debating aesthetic issues, and composing short analytical papers about poems. There are two required written assignments, a midterm and a final examination.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

British Literature II
AS.060.210 (01)

This course provides a framework for grasping the dazzling variety and explosive innovation of literature in English during the last quarter-millennium. Attending both to textual details and to historical contexts, we will see how Wordsworth, Austen, Keats, Tennyson, Dickens, Wilde, Woolf, Rushdie, and other writers extend and undo tradition, illuminate their times and places as well as our own, and conspire to bring to us the intense experience distinctive to great literary art.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

How Not to be Afraid of Poetry
AS.060.211 (03)

What is poetry? And why don't we like it? This course will explore what makes poetry turn ordinary language into something extraordinary. Opening up a range of poetry in English, the course will involve reading poetry aloud, thinking about poetry and its forms, and gaining experience in understanding poetry. Assignments will include attending to details small and large in poems, becoming an expert about a single poet, debating aesthetic issues, and composing short analytical papers about poems. There are two required written assignments, a midterm and a final examination.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC

Expository Writing:
AS.060.114 (26)

“Expos” is designed to introduce more confident student writers to the elements of academic argument. Students learn to apply the paradigm of academic argument in academic essays of their own. Classes are capped at 15 students and organized around four major writing assignments. Each course guides students’ practice through pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and includes discussions, workshops, and tutorials with the instructor. In addition to its central focus on the elements of academic argument, each “Expos” course teaches students to document sources correctly and provides its own topic or theme to engage students’ writing and thinking. Please see the Expository Writing Program's website for individual course descriptions to decide which sections of “Expos” will most interest you. “Expos” courses are available to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, and to seniors by special permission from the English Department.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Shakespeare
AS.060.207 (01)

Reading the major comedies, histories and tragedies alongside the narrative poem “Venus and Adonis” and the sonnets, this survey course considers Shakespeare’s hybrid career as poet and playwright. Pre 1800 course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/20
  • PosTag(s): ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800

The Literature of the Atlantic Slavery
AS.060.331 (01)

This seminar will trace the historical development of the slavery debate in the Atlantic world through examination of key texts from a host of genres and locations—Quaker religious tracts, political documents like the Haitian Declaration of Independence, Cuban antislavery novels, slave narratives, and “classics” of American literature like Melville’s Benito Cereno. We will consider how the institution of Atlantic slavery was variously represented, justified, and criticized, discovering in the process the deep structures of modern slavery discourse.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology,literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/70
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

"All Art is Propaganda"
AS.060.327 (01)

This course will explore black literature written as protest. We will examine how, in the face of threats to black life, Frances E.W. Harper, Richard Wright, Amiri Baraka, and others have realized versions of W.E.B. Du Bois’s objective: “all art is propaganda and ever must be, despite the wailing of the purists.”

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Expository Writing: Introduction to the Research Paper - Controversies in Adolescence
AS.060.155 (02)

“Introduction to the Research Paper” is designed to introduce more experienced student writers to the fundamental skills of the research process. These include asking research questions, evaluating the usefulness of sources to answer them, synthesizing sources, reading sources critically, and developing arguments that deliver an original thesis. Students will work with a research librarian at the Eisenhower Library, with whom they will learn to navigate traditional databases as well as new media sources. The Research Paper is topic-based and divided into three linked units of instruction. The course culminates with a paper of 10-12 pages that draws upon the cumulative skills of the semester. Each course is capped at ten students and available only to those who have taken “Expository Writing” (060.113/114)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Latin American Critical Perspectives on Colonialism: From the 'World Upside Down' to the 'Coloniality of Power'
AS.215.290 (01)

This course, taught in English, examines how indigenous and local (postcolonial) intellectuals in Latin America responded to the ideology and practices of Spanish Colonialism in the earliest post-conquest years (1532), continued to battle colonialism during the period of the wars of independence, and finally arrived at the production of an analysis that shows how modernity is but the other face of colonialism. Among key works to be discussed are Guaman Poma's illustrated sixteenth-century chronicles, D.F. Sarramiento's _Civilization and Barbarism_ (1845), and Anibal Quijano's "Coloniality of Power" (2000).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST

German Literary Modernism
AS.213.328 (02)

Taught in English. German Literary Modernism focuses on modernist works of literature between 1900-1930, considering central modernist authors against the backdrop of dramatic changes and events in European culture and society, including urbanization, technological change, the First World War, and social and artistic movements. Students will engage literary works--by such authors as Kafka, Rilke, Hofmannsthal and Thomas Mann--that express a sense of crisis about modern life, or provoke questions about the nature of reality, the human self, the reliability of perception, and the possibilities of language and art. ​Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/5
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL

Capitalism and Tragedy: from the 18th Century to Climate Change
AS.300.349 (01)

In contemporary discussions of climate change, it is an increasingly prevalent view that capitalism will lead to the destruction of civilization as we know it. The notion that capitalism is hostile to what makes human life worth living, however, is one that stretches back at least to the early eighteenth century. In this class, we will examine key moments in the history of this idea in works of literature, philosophy, and politics, from the birth of bourgeois tragedy in the 1720s, through topics such as imperialism and economic exploitation, to the prospects of our ecological future today. Authors to be studied: George Lillo, Balzac, Dickens, Marx and Engels, Ibsen, Weber, Brecht, Arthur Miller, Steinbeck, Pope Francis, and contemporary fiction, politics and philosophy on climate change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Black Utopias
AS.362.311 (01)

In this course, we will read literary and historical texts that present visions of black utopia. Authors include “Ethiop” (William J. Wilson), Marcus Garvey, Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Gender and Sexuality beyond the Global West: Stitching Women-Sewing and Gender, Labor, and Art
AS.363.331 (01)

What’s radical about stitching? And how did sewing coming to be viewed—across centuries, cultures, regions, and political epochs—as (in embroidery artist Hannah Hill’s words) “women’s work”? This course will analyze and discuss how work with needle and thread has been associated with women, their bodies, and the domestic space where the repetitive labor of mending, the mixed opportunity for making, and the devalued practice of the “applied arts” took place. Looking at histories of work, fictions, and visual objects, we will explore stitching’s gendered past and its potential for oppressive normativity and radical, creative expression alike. Over the semester, our course follows the “red thread” of stitching via four short response papers (or one Unessay), one in-class presentation, and one final oral history/research project on an inter-disciplinary discussion related to the (often radical) politics and poetics of women’s lives and works. Authors and artists may include Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Emily Dickinson, Elizabeth Gaskell, Virginia Woolf, Alice Walker, Carol Ann Duffy, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Tracey Emin, Louise Bourgeois, Elaine Reichek, Silvia Federici, Mariarosa dalla Costa, Kyung-Ah Ham, and Project Runway.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan England
AS.363.445 (01)

If Shakespeare had a sister who went to London to be a writer, what would she write? Virginia Woolf’s account of the thwarted career of Shakespeare’s hypothetical sister, Judith, in A Room of One’s Own frames our reading of plays and poetry by Shakespeare and contemporary women writers, including Isabella Whitney, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Sidney, Aemelia Lanyer, and Mary Wroth. Working within a selected historical context, students will create fictional biographies of “Judith Shakespeare,” including her perspective on our identified authors and a sample or description of Judith’s own literary accomplishments. Secondary course readings will reflect contemporary economic, political, and religious contexts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

German Literary Modernism
AS.213.328 (01)

Taught in English. German Literary Modernism focuses on modernist works of literature between 1900-1930, considering central modernist authors against the backdrop of dramatic changes and events in European culture and society, including urbanization, technological change, the First World War, and social and artistic movements. Students will engage literary works--by such authors as Kafka, Rilke, Hofmannsthal and Thomas Mann--that express a sense of crisis about modern life, or provoke questions about the nature of reality, the human self, the reliability of perception, and the possibilities of language and art. ​Students have the option of an additional hour of German discussion and doing all the assignments in German for German-language credit (3+1) towards the major or minor. Students interested in that option should register for section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.040.420 (01)Classics Research Lab: The Symonds ProjectTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMButler, Michael Shane, Dean, GabrielleGilman 108GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.060.114 (01)Expository Writing: Medicine, East and WestMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMFlowers, JamesMaryland 217
AS.060.100 (01)Introduction to Expository WritingMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMEvans, WilliamGilman 10
AS.060.100 (04)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBrodsky, Anne-Elizabeth MurdyGilman 10
AS.060.100 (03)Introduction to Expository WritingTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMBrodsky, Anne-Elizabeth MurdyGilman 10
AS.060.107 (01)Introduction to Literary StudyTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMThompson, Mark CGilman 75
AS.060.107 (02)Introduction to Literary StudyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMMiller, AndrewGilman 400
AS.060.114 (02)Expository Writing: Illness and Social StigmaMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMLossada, Alexandra MariaGilman 130D
AS.060.100 (02)Introduction to Expository WritingMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMEvans, WilliamGilman 10
AS.060.114 (03)Expository Writing: Science, Subjectivity, and the Problem of ConsciousnessMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMLindeman, David MichaelHodson 211
AS.060.114 (04)Expository Writing: American GothicMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMZecca, Amanda ElizabethGilman 217
AS.060.114 (25)Expository Writing:TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWatters, AlizaGilman 186
AS.060.114 (05)Expository Writing: What Is Love?MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKoullas, Sandy GillianSmokler Center 301
AS.060.114 (24)Expository Writing:TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMStaffSmokler Center 301
AS.211.351 (01)Why Poetry Matters: Poets Between Lies and Truth in the English and Italian RenaissanceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBrenna, FrancescoBloomberg 172GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.060.402 (01)The Computer in Modern LiteratureW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRosenthal, Jesse KarlGilman 130D
AS.211.203 (01)Propaganda: From Blut und Boden to Post-FactTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMBiddle, Wayne, Wegenstein, BernadetteHodson 301GRLL-ENGL
AS.060.388 (01)Old World/New World WomenM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAchinstein, SharonGilman 400ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.114 (12)Expository Writing: Nature, Culture, and Climate ChangeMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDoherty, Nathanael JosephMaryland 114
AS.060.114 (06)Expository Writing: Law and RevengeMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMOppel, GeorgeMaryland 104
AS.060.114 (11)Expository Writing: JusticeMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKirmizidag, NurMaryland 104
AS.060.114 (07)Expository Writing: What Is Love?MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKoullas, Sandy GillianSmokler Center Library
AS.060.114 (08)Expository Writing: Law and RevengeMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMOppel, GeorgeMaryland 309
AS.060.114 (09)Expository Writing: Inequality and Urban DesignMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMSpeller, Morris Elsmere LongleyHackerman 320
AS.060.114 (10)Expository Writing: What Is Mental Illness?MW 1:30PM - 2:45PMAndonovski, NikolaSmokler Center 301
AS.060.114 (19)Expository Writing: Democracy and LiesTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMTutunji, TarekGilman 186
AS.060.114 (16)Expository Writing: The Ethics of TourismTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStreim, Alexander MichaelAmes 320
AS.060.114 (22)Expository Writing: Comedy and CrossdressingTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMBest, Royce LeeGilman 277
AS.060.114 (23)Expository Writing: Age of Collapse?TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAlbert, Michael JamesLevering Conf. A
AS.060.114 (13)Expository Writing: The Dark Side of ProgressTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMRoss, Sarah Catherine 
AS.060.114 (14)Expository Writing: Cross-Cultural Encounters in the Middle AgesTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMDaniels, Nathan AdamGilman 134
AS.060.114 (18)Expository Writing: Cli-Fi Climate Change FictionTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWestcott, Christopher JohnGilman 313
AS.060.114 (17)Expository Writing: Black Panther, Race, and RepresentationTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMakonnen, Atesede RettaGilman 130D
AS.060.114 (21)Expository Writing: Violence and MacbethTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMO'Connor, Marie TMaryland 114
AS.060.114 (15)Expository Writing: Romanticism, the Strange, and the OtherworldlyTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMChilders, Joel MichaelGilman 130D
AS.060.114 (20)Expository Writing:Violence and MacbethTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMO'Connor, Marie TGilman 219
AS.060.139 (01)Expository Writing: The Narrative EssayMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKain, PatriciaGilman 77
AS.060.129 (01)Writing Africa NowTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMJackson, Jeanne-MarieMaryland 217
AS.060.155 (01)Expository Writing: Introduction to the Research Paper - Controversies in AdolescenceTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWatters, AlizaSmokler Center 301
AS.060.207 (03)ShakespeareMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMDaniel, AndrewGilman 132ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.210 (02)British Literature IIMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRosenthal, Jesse KarlAmes 234ENGL-LEC
AS.060.207 (02)ShakespeareMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMDaniel, AndrewGilman 132ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.211 (02)How Not to be Afraid of PoetryMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMAchinstein, SharonHackerman B 17ENGL-LEC
AS.060.210 (03)British Literature IIMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRosenthal, Jesse KarlAmes 234ENGL-LEC
AS.060.323 (01)Mind, Body, and Materialist Science in Victorian LiteratureT 4:00PM - 6:20PMLee, Sung MeyKrieger 306
AS.060.342 (01)Contemporary Novel of IdeasW 1:30PM - 4:00PMJackson, Jeanne-MarieKrieger 302
AS.060.211 (01)How Not to be Afraid of PoetryMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMAchinstein, SharonHackerman B 17ENGL-LEC
AS.060.210 (01)British Literature IIMW 11:00AM - 11:50AM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMRosenthal, Jesse KarlAmes 234ENGL-LEC
AS.060.211 (03)How Not to be Afraid of PoetryMW 10:00AM - 10:50AM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMAchinstein, SharonHackerman B 17ENGL-LEC
AS.060.114 (26)Expository Writing:TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWatters, AlizaMaryland 104
AS.060.207 (01)ShakespeareMW 12:00PM - 12:50PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMDaniel, AndrewGilman 132ENGL-LEC, ENGL-PR1800
AS.060.331 (01)The Literature of the Atlantic SlaveryTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMHickman, Jared WBloomberg 278
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMStephens, Walter ELevering ArellanoGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.060.327 (01)"All Art is Propaganda"TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMNurhussein, NadiaGilman 134
AS.060.155 (02)Expository Writing: Introduction to the Research Paper - Controversies in AdolescenceTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMWatters, AlizaSmokler Center 301
AS.215.290 (01)Latin American Critical Perspectives on Colonialism: From the 'World Upside Down' to the 'Coloniality of Power'W 1:30PM - 4:00PMCastro-Klaren, SaraBloomberg 274GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-SPAN, INST-GLOBAL, INST-NWHIST
AS.213.328 (02)German Literary ModernismTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaGilman 219GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL
AS.300.349 (01)Capitalism and Tragedy: from the 18th Century to Climate ChangeTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMLisi, LeonardoGilman 208GRLL-ENGL
AS.362.311 (01)Black UtopiasTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMNurhussein, NadiaKrieger 306
AS.363.331 (01)Gender and Sexuality beyond the Global West: Stitching Women-Sewing and Gender, Labor, and ArtTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRoss, Sarah CatherineBloomberg 276
AS.363.445 (01)Reading Judith Shakespeare: Women and Gender in Elizabethan EnglandW 1:30PM - 4:00PMPatton, Elizabeth 
AS.213.328 (01)German Literary ModernismTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaGilman 219GRLL-GERM, GRLL-ENGL